Sutton Barns, Brook Lane, Endon. Level 3 Building Survey (OASIS ID: melmorri1-263360)

Mel Morris Conservation, 2017

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1040800
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Mel Morris Conservation (2017) Sutton Barns, Brook Lane, Endon. Level 3 Building Survey (OASIS ID: melmorri1-263360) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1040800

Introduction

Sutton Barns, Brook Lane, Endon. Level 3 Building Survey (OASIS ID: melmorri1-263360)

The farm group at Sutton House is an important, loose courtyard plan farmstead, with evidence of incremental development from the early 17th century through to the mid 19th century. The foldyard and the relationship between the buildings is well-preserved and a particularly important part of the significance of the group. It is very rare for farmsteads to have more than a barn and house dating from 1540-1750. For this reason the group is of high significance. Surviving examples of pre-19th-century cow houses – including within combination barns - are rare in a national context and are of high significance. The main barn at Sutton House is a rare and early survival in this district (ca. 1700) and an unusual building type in the region. There are only 3 true dated bank barns of this type and 18th century date in Cumbria and none recorded in Staffordshire or Derbyshire, although on close inspection there are several which may prove to be the same type. Its historic and architectural character is largely manifest in the external elevations. Internal modifications have changed the character of the space and have removed much of the evidence. However, the northern threshing barn remains substantially as built and the low cow-house contains evidence in the walls and floor for its original function.