Surrey Archaeological Society Research Volumes

Surrey Archaeological Society, 2016

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Surrey Archaeological Society (2016) Surrey Archaeological Society Research Volumes [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1037304

Surrey Archaeological Society Research Volumes (1974) Volume 1.


Excavations in Old Town Croydon; The Montague Close Delftware Factory; Excavations of a Glasshouse at Norfolk House, Lambeth;The River Wey Bridges between Farnham and Guildford.


Table of Contents

Title pages and contents
Anon. (pp. i-iv)
PDF 97 Kb
Excavations in Old Town Croydon, 1968/70: a Middle Saxon to Post-Medieval Occupation Sequence
PETER DREWETT (pp. 1-45)
Abstract

Abstract

Excavations in Old Town Croydon, 1968/70: a Middle Saxon to Post-Medieval Occupation Sequence
PETER DREWETT (pp. 1-45)

Rescue excavations were undertaken to establish a later Saxon, medieval and post-medieval pottery sequence in the Croydon area and to trace the extent of early urban occupation in Croydon.

PDF 6 Mb
The Montague Close Delftware Factory prior to 1969
G J DAWSON and RHODA EDWARDS (pp. 47-63)
Abstract

Abstract

The Montague Close Delftware Factory prior to 1969
G J DAWSON and RHODA EDWARDS (pp. 47-63)

Part 1 describes finds of delftware waste material near Southwark Cathedral before 1969 and part 2 covers the documentary evidence. From the viewpoint of documentary evidence, the delftware manufacturing site at Montague Close in St Saviour’s parish, Southwark, can be regarded as one of the most important in London. It had a continuous productive life of nearly a hundred and fifty years. This is a period longer than the duration of any other delftware site in London that has been already investigated by excavation. The kilns excavated at Montague Close have more substantial fabric remaining than any others known in this country.

PDF 3 Mb
Excavation of a Glasshouse at Norfolk House, Lambeth
G J DAWSON (pp. 65-74)
Abstract

Abstract

Excavation of a Glasshouse at Norfolk House, Lambeth
G J DAWSON (pp. 65-74)

During building operations on this site, a number of features of archaeological interest were found. Most of them were connected with a delftware factory, and these have been published elsewhere. Excavation of the basement of the new building cut a section through a structure associated with much glass waste material. The structure, as exposed, was very difficult to interpret due to its mutilated state and only very partial excavation. It is clear from the scorching of the gravel that intense heat was produced by the process that occurred in the structure, and the presence of large quantities of broken and distorted glass bottles, lumps of glass and tubing clearly shows that the manufacture of glass was involved; that is, that the structure was a glass kiln or furnace of 19th century date.

PDF 961 Kb
The River Wey Bridges between Farnham and Guildford
DEREK F RENN (pp. 75-83)
Abstract

Abstract

The River Wey Bridges between Farnham and Guildford
DEREK F RENN (pp. 75-83)

At one time, the river Blackwater was fed by streams flowing from Alton, Frensham and Hindhead, through the fault in the chalk outcrop between Farnham and the Hog’s Back. Slight earth movements and erosion changes, however, enabled a stream flowing eastward from Elstead to Godalming to cut back its bed and capture the headwaters of the Blackwater and divert them into the river Wey. The 10-mile stretch of river south of the Hog’s Back is spanned by a notable series of bridges. Some are better-known than others, and the purpose of this paper is, first, to record the details of the bridges as they existed in 1970, second, to examine their construction and, lastly, to discuss their probable date and original purpose.

PDF 704 Kb
Index
Anon. (pp. 85-86)
PDF 151 Kb