Gaffney, V. L., Fitch, S. and Smith, D. N., (2009). Europe's lost world. York: Council for British Archaeology.

Title
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Title:
Europe's lost world
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Subtitle:
the rediscovery of Doggerland
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Council for British Archaeology Research Reports
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Volume:
160
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223
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DOI
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Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter (in Series)
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Author:
Vincent L Gaffney
Simon Fitch
David N Smith
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Council for British Archaeology
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Year of Publication:
2009
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biab_online
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URL: http://new.archaeologyuk.org/full-list-of-publications
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12 Apr 2011
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Abstract
Discussion of 'Doggerland' - the submerged Mesolithic landscape of the North Sea basin. \r\nOutlines the history of archaeological investigations into the area, followed by\r\nan introduction to the British Mesolithic, relating knowledge from excavated sites to what Mesolithic life on Doggerland might have been like.\r\nDiscusses the development of under-sea mapping techniques, noting available modern techniques with their strengths and limitations, and outlines the extent of the North Sea basin that has been surveyed using these techniques. Follows this by detailing some of the major features (rivers, estuaries, banks, hills) that have been revealed and discusses the resources these landscape features would have provided to their Mesolithic inhabitants. \r\nAttempts to reconstruct the climate and vegetation of the North Sea basin, using a combination of data from inland sites during the time period, with data from geographical undersea survey. Notes that very little work has been done directly on environmental material from undersea sites.\r\nFollowing is an overview of flood stories and mythical sunken lands from across the world, and of actual submerged landmasses such as Beringia and Sundaland. Discusses the implications of living on a visibly shrinking landmass for the Mesolithic inhabitants of Doggerland's ways of thinking about water, and speculates as to their feelings about the visible remains of submerged landscapes. Notes the prevalence of water-side deposits from excavated sites of the period. \r\nConcludes by noting the need for extensive further research, and notes threats from modern resource extraction. Emphasises the need to make governments aware of the richness of the archaeological resource. Also considers the implications of our knowledge about Doggerland for modern climate change. Ends with a glossary. PP-B