Banks, I., Duffy, P. R J. and MacGregor, G., (2008). Archaeology of Landscape Change in South-West Scotland, 6000 BC '“ AD 1400. Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. https://doi.org/10.5284/1017938.

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeology of Landscape Change in South-West Scotland, 6000 BC '“ AD 1400
Subtitle
Subtitle
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Subtitle:
excavations at William Grant and Sons Distillery, Girvan
Series
Series
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Series:
Scottish Archaeological Internet Reports
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
32
Pages
Pages
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Number of Pages:
45
Downloads
Downloads
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Downloads:
sair32.pdf (2 MB) : Download
DOI
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DOI
https://doi.org/10.5284/1017938
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
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Abstract:
Between 1996 and 1998, Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) undertook a programme of archaeological investigation at the headquarters of William Grant and Sons Distillers Ltd, Girvan. The work revealed evidence of occupation and use from prehistoric times, including palaeobotanical and pedological evidence of deliberate prehistoric tree clearance, and the presence of six discrete deposits of burnt mound material. The project also confirmed the survival of archaeological deposits relating to the occupation of the medieval moated enclosure of Ladywell. A number of worked lithics, indicative of prehistoric tool making or maintenance, were also recovered.<br /><br />The excavation and post-excavation work allowed an opportunity to explore the occupational, ecological and geomorphological history of the entire length of the valley, from the immediate post-glacial period to the present day. The results contribute significantly to our understanding of the changing patterns of human interaction with environment and landscape over a period of some 10,000 years, both in the immediate area and beyond.
Author
Author
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Author:
Iain Banks
Paul R J Duffy
Gavin MacGregor
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2008
ISBN
ISBN
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ISBN:
0 903903 98 1
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Source:
DigitalBorn
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Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
09 May 2011
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Abstract
1
Between 1996 and 1998, Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) undertook a programme of archaeological investigation at the headquarters of William Grant and Sons Distillers Ltd, Girvan. The work revealed evidence of occupation and use from prehistoric times, including palaeobotanical and pedological evidence of deliberate prehistoric tree clearance, and the presence of six discrete deposits of burnt mound material. The project also confirmed the survival of archaeological deposits relating to the occupation of the medieval moated enclosure of Ladywell. A number of worked lithics, indicative of prehistoric tool making or maintenance, were also recovered.\r\n\r\nThe excavation and post-excavation work allowed an opportunity to explore the occupational, ecological and geomorphological history of the entire length of the valley, from the immediate post-glacial period to the present day. The results contribute significantly to our understanding of the changing patterns of human interaction with environment and landscape over a period of some 10,000 years, both in the immediate area and beyond.
Paul R J Duffy
2 - 3
Information on site location, geology and the circumstances of the work are presented.
Paul R J Duffy
4
The immediate environs of the Grant's complex are a rich palimpsest of archaeological remains, attested from a variety of sources, and the general area has considerable cropmark evidence of human activity from the later prehistoric onwards.
Paul R J Duffy
Iain Banks
5
A short summary of the methodology employed.
Iain Banks
Paul R J Duffy
Gavin MacGregor
Keith Speller
Stuart Halliday
Robert S Will
6 - 26
The results of the project and discussions of the findings are presented below in a synthetic narrative based on the three main evidence strands for occupation in the valley. These comprise the burnt mound deposits, wood and inundations, the moated enclosure and its environs.
27
John Syme Duncan
Jennifer J Miller
Susan Ramsey
Catherine Smith
Eland Stuart
Ewan Campbell
Robert S Will
Paul R J Duffy
27 - 34
This chapter contains specialist reports on soils, botanical remains, animal bone, chipped stone, a glass bead, medieval pottery and radiocarbon dates.
Jennifer J Miller
Susan Ramsay
27 - 29
Catherine Smith
29 - 30
Eland Stuart
30 - 33
Ewan Campbell
33
Paul R J Duffy
33 - 34
Robert S Will
33
Paul R J Duffy
35 - 36
The work contributes to the current understanding of human occupation within the Girvan area and the relationship such activity had to a constantly changing environment over time. In particular the proejct clearly demonstrated the high potential for organic preservation of material dating as far back as the Mesolithic, and the potential that such material has for providing rarely glimpsed evidence of the inter-relationship between human agency and environment in past landscapes. The organic potential of similar such valleys in this part of south-west Scotland is clear.
37
38 - 40
Iain Banks
Paul R J Duffy
Gavin MacGregor
Between 1996 and 1998, Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) undertook a programme of archaeological investigation at the headquarters of William Grant and Sons Distillers Ltd, Girvan. The work revealed evidence of occupation and use from prehistoric times, including palaeobotanical and pedological evidence of deliberate prehistoric tree clearance, and the presence of six discrete deposits of burnt mound material. The project also confirmed the survival of archaeological deposits relating to the occupation of the medieval moated enclosure of Ladywell. A number of worked lithics, indicative of prehistoric tool making or maintenance, were also recovered.\r\n\r\nThe excavation and post-excavation work allowed an opportunity to explore the occupational, ecological and geomorphological history of the entire length of the valley, from the immediate post-glacial period to the present day. The results contribute significantly to our understanding of the changing patterns of human interaction with environment and landscape over a period of some 10,000 years, both in the immediate area and beyond.