Elsworth, D., (2007). Sowerby Hall Farm, Bank Lane, Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria: Archaeological Building Recording. Ulverston: Greenlane Archaeology Ltd.

Title
Title
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Title:
Sowerby Hall Farm, Bank Lane, Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria: Archaeological Building Recording
Series
Series
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Series:
Greenlane Archaeology Ltd unpublished report series
Downloads
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Downloads:
greenlan1-45387_1.pdf (7 MB) : Download
DOI
DOI
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DOI
https://doi.org/10.5284/1003561
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Report (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
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Abstract:
The investigation of the building revealed that the earliest structure was a large threshing barn with a remarkably intact and complex raised cruck roof structure supported by angled knee braces and wind braces. The site was later enlarged with the addition of several outshuts and a separate building to the east, which was eventually used as a dairy. As the emphasis at the site changed during the 19th and early 20th centuries to one based on the keeping of cattle more buildings were added, including a large shippon, which was attached to the north end of the barn. As a result of these alterations a large number of doorways were added to the barn, and these changes, combined with general deterioration, led to movement in its south wall. The collapse of part of the east wall of the dairy was probably due to similar causes. The barn is an extremely important structure and represents a rare survival of such an early and architecturally impressive building. There are few directly comparative examples in the immediate area, although a barn at Park House Farm at Heversham has an almost identical roof structure; its origins are uncertain, although it seems unlikely to pre-date 1362 and is also considered to be of 16th century date. The shippon is also a significant building for the complex at Sowerby Hall, as it represents the peak of its development as a cattle farm, while the majority of the other structures are historically and architecturally much less significant.
Author
Author
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Author:
D Elsworth
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Greenlane Archaeology Ltd
Other Person/Org
Other Person/Org
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Other Person/Org:
Historic England (OASIS Reviewer)
Cumbria HER (OASIS Reviewer)
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2007
Locations
Locations
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Locations:
Site: Sowerby Hall Farm, Bank Lane, Barrow in Furness, Cumbria
Parish: BARROW IN FURNESS
District: BARROW IN FURNESS
County: CUMBRIA
Country: England
Grid Reference: 319862, 472467 (Easting, Northing)
Locations
Locations
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Subjects / Periods:
Find: N/A Uncertain
Monus: Cow House Post Medieval
Monus: Dairy Post Medieval
Monus: Threshing Barn Post Medieval
Identifiers
Identifiers
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Identifiers:
OASIS Id: greenlan1-45387
Note
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Note:
Spiral-bound printed A4 report
Source
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Source:
OASIS
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Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
23 Nov 2016
 Location