Schofield, J., (2004). Modern Military Matters. Studying and managing the twentieth-century defence heritage in Britain: a discussion document.

Title
Title
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Title:
Modern Military Matters. Studying and managing the twentieth-century defence heritage in Britain: a discussion document
Series
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Series:
Council for British Archaeology Occasional Papers
Volume
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Volume:
24
Pages
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Number of Pages:
65
Downloads
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Downloads:
cba_op_024.pdf (3 MB) : Download
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph
Abstract
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Abstract:
The need has been identified for a clear and coherent statement of the state of knowledge and future research priorities relating to the study and management of twentieth-century military remains in Britain. This is a large and diverse subject whose research might variously involve the use of documents, oral history and secondary sources, alongside physical remains in the form of, for example, archaeological and architectural evidence (terrestrial and maritime), wall art and graffiti, and the character or 'personality' of militarised areas. Over the last three decades much valuable work has been undertaken in these related fields by amateur and professional researchers, culminating in national strategic studies such as the Defence of Britain Project and projects commissioned by English Heritage's Monuments Protection Programme (MPP), Historic Scotland and RCAHMS, and other heritage agencies. At the conclusion of these related studies it is timely that we address the state of knowledge, and consider for the first time future research and priorities. Consequently, this report is divided into three sections: 1 resource assessment - reviewing the current state of knowledge 2 research agenda - what gaps exist in our understanding of the subject, and how these research needs might be met 3 priorities for implementing the agenda. This discussion document and particularly the agenda will be time limited, requiring regular review and modification as the subject matures and develops. Its purpose is to promote dialogue and discussion amongst a wide audience, extend owndership and participation, improve understanding, and to generate ever more refined and intellectually robust research agenda. Yet, this is a document that starts from a position of strength. Much work on modern military archaeology has been completed in the past decade, in the form of coordinated strategic studies, providing a sound basis from which local and more detailed research programmes can proceed. This is not therefore a document that attempts to give focus where focus and coordination were previously lacking. Rather, it attempts to promote targeted academic research, and give a focus to evaluation and archaeological investigations that arise through planning and development control procedures. In other words it is a document that provides context and recommends priorities; affirms the value and cultural benefits of studying modern military sites; and confirms their place alongside other more conventional categories of cultural heritage. As the title states: modern military matters.
Author
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Author:
John Schofield
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2004
ISBN
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ISBN:
1 902771 37 0
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ADS Archive
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Created Date
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Created Date:
24 Mar 2017