Series: Pre-Construct Archaeology (Lincoln) unpublished report series

Pre-Construct Archaeological Services Ltd (Lincoln)
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Year of Publication (Start): 1993
Year of Publication (End): 2105
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D Underhill
Pre-Construct Archaeological Services Ltd (PCAS) was requested by J. H. Walter to undertake a scheme of archaeological evaluation trenching on the site of a proposed new wind turbine on land at Hollywell Farm, off Chelveston Road near Stanwick in East Northamptonshire. The development is to consist of a 500kW wind turbine with maximum hub height of 50m, blade diameter of 54m and maximum height to the blade tip of 77m, with a transformer station at the base of the turbine and ancillary works. The groundworks were undertaken in early April, 2013.
2013
R D Savage
Archaeological monitoring and recording was carried out during the excavation of foundation trenches for the construction of a replacement house on land at 'Chesterton' on Scothern Lane in Dunholme, Lincolnshire. The development site is situated on the periphery of the early medieval to post-medieval settlement of Dunholme, and is close to a medieval moated manor site identified by previous archaeological work in the vicinity. Archaeological evaluations previously carried out to the south and south-west of the site encountered only natural waterborne deposits, and concluded that the area had until recently been waterlogged marginal land, unsuitable for habitation or permanent cultivation. No datable deposits pre-dating the 20th century were recorded during the construction groundworks. A stony deposit below the subsoil may have represented an earlier ground consolidation episode, but no datable material was retrieved from it.
2012
M Johnstone
Excavation of footings for the installation of public art on the Queens Sconce in Newark. located on the bastion of the Scheduled Ancient Monument The excavation revealed no finds or features of archaeological significance.
2013
Anon
2005
R D Gardner
2003
Rowe Emily
An evaluation of 3 trenches were excavated at 10 James Street, Lincoln, ahead of a planning application. The site lies within the SAM of the roman fortress and colonia and within the medieval Cathedral close. The Close Wall forms the northern boundary to the site. Only post-medieval features were iderntified which could be linked to an 1840 lease map of the site.
2008
R D Savage
J Sleap
A programme of archaeological mitigation was implemented during a series of groundworks associated with the construction of a new dwelling on land at 10, James Street in the city of Lincoln. The site lies within the Scheduled Ancient Monument area of the Roman city of Lindum Colonia, and adjoins the Close Wall, which defined the medieval city's ecclesiastical district. It was formerly part of the gardens of Burghersh Chantry House, an 18th-century Listed Building which lies to the south of the site and had a medieval antecedent. Two distinct construction phases, separated by a period of demolition and consolidation, were identified during the groundworks. The more recent phase could confidently be identified as part of the stable block associated with Burghersh Chantry House, which appears on 19th century Ordnance Survey mapping, and was demolished prior to the construction of the mid-20th-century bungalow formerly occupying the site. A group of earlier stone structures were recorded during trenching for the ground beam foundations of the new house. These structures may represent outbuildings built at the same time as Burghersh Chantry House, in or around 1345, and demolished at the time of its rebuilding in the 18th century, which may well have incorporated a remodelling of its gardens.
2012
Anon
2005
Anon
2005
Anon
2005
Anon
1999
R Mandeville
This document details the results of an Archaeological Monitoring and Recording scheme, prepared for John Halton Design on behalf of Mr. Sowerby, associated with the addition of a new conservatory and a garage to the existing buildings at 17 Eastgate, Lincoln. The site lies in the upper city, less than 100m north-east of Lincoln Cathedral. The property lies on the corner of Eastgate and Priory Road/Nettleham Road, centred on SK 9793 7193. The existing stone built property at 17 Eastgate was first built in the mid 17th century, and is protected by Grade II Listed Building status. It is flanked to the east by No. 18, a mid 18th century private dwelling, and lies close to the Church of St. Peter built in 1870; a mid 18th century ashlar boundary stone is set into the front wall of the property, paired with another on the south side of Eastgate. All of these buildings are also Grade II Listed Buildings. The monitoring of the groundworks revealed a depth of 0.85m of modern overburden. This sealed a thick, undated deposit of limestone rich gritty silt that continued beyond the limit of excavation. This was cut by a linear feature, possibly representing a drain of early modern date, although no finds were recovered, and no conclusive date could be suggested.
2016
Rowe Emily
Pre-Construct Archaeology (Lincoln) carried out an archaeological evaluation for J. Derbyshire Design Partnership on land at 2 Church Lane, Bonby, North Lincolnshire. A total of six evaluation trenches were excavated. Evidence that may represent settlement activity associated with the medieval village was recorded in three of the trenches. A post-medieval ditch was identified and probably represents an element of garden design. A number of other features, including three linear features and a stone feature of unknown purpose, were identified but produced no dating evidence.
2008
K D Francis
Pre-Construct Archaeological Services Ltd (PCAS) were commissioned by J. Derbyshire Design Partnership (Agent) to undertake a scheme of archaeological mitigation on land at 2, Church Lane, Bonby, Lincolnshire (centred on NGR: TA 0029 1542). The archaeological mitigation work conducted between May 2009 and February 2011 showed that the site formed part of a high status post-medieval (and possibly late medieval) settlement area or habitation. This is particularly evident from the latrine and from the assemblages and artefacts it contained; and from the dovecote. The location of these features on the eastern edge of the site and the absence of similar archaeology to the west suggests that the focus of this settlement was to the immediate east of the site.
2012
Anon
2000
B Wheeliker
A planning application for the construction of two new extensions to the existing dwelling at 25s Drury Lane has been conditionally approved by the City of Lincoln Council. The site lies on the south side of Drury Lane on the corner with Gibraltar Hill almost directly adjacent to Lincoln Castle. The site lies in the heart of the historic core of the Roman city, directly adjacent to the 1st century Roman fort and within the area of the Scheduled Monument of the Roman colonia which developed around the fort in the following centuries, therefore there is high potential for archaeological remains to be encountered in the new footing trenches. During the Saxon period Lincoln experienced a decline, with activity and occupation retreating within the walls of the Roman city. Few Saxon artefacts or features have been found in this vicinity, but as the site lies within the walled Roman colonia it is possible evidence of activity in this period may be encountered. Due to the somewhat precarious location of the site on the edge of the downward slope of the Lincoln Escarpment, it is likely the site remained undeveloped throughout the medieval and post-medieval period. Early OS mapping indicates the site was part of the Bishops Hostel in the late 19th century, surrounded by housing of the same period. The semi-detached properties of 25 and 25a Drury Lane are among the more recent properties in this area, built in 1934 for a private developer. No archaeological features were observed during the course of the watching brief. Excavations revealed only topsoil, with subsoils at the base of the footings. The depth of the topsoil is unusual and may indicate this material was transported to the site for landscaping. Undisturbed layers plausibly remain beneath the new development.
2015
L Brocklehurst
Archaeological monitoring and recording was carried out on the site of a rear extension to an existing property at 27 Saxon Street, Lincoln. Saxon Street is located in the north of Lincoln City, within the City's Burton Road Character Area and No. 9 Conservation Area. No archaeological features or finds were encountered.
2014
Colin P H Palmer-Brown
A watching brief during groundworks for the construction of a house recovered the remains of two Bronze Age inhumations, each lying within a shallow pit , and accompanied by a decorated beaker. The inhumations comprised incomplete and disarticulated human bones. A third pit-like feature was also revealed, although no human remains were recovered from the section excavated. Features of Saxon/early medieval date were also revealed, including two large post holes and two shallow trenches. [AIP]
1994
Colin P H Palmer-Brown
An intermittent archaeological watching brief was maintained on the site of a new petrol filling station in an area of known medieval settlement activity. Overall, the site yielded significant information concerning later medieval development at Boston and raised important questions regarding the expansion of the town in areas where previous assessments had revealed very little by way of medieval settlement remains. [Au]
1995
B Wheeliker
Rob Bradley Building Design, acting on behalf of Mr and Mrs D. Holden, received a Grant of Planning Permission for the erection of a three storey dwelling (RESUBMISSION), in accordance with revised drawing nos. 168/08/01, 168/08/02 and 168/08/03 received15th April 2010 (City of Lincoln Council Planning Application No.: 2010/0119/F). The site is located on Milman Road, on the central-eastern side of Lincoln City, within the City's Milman Road to Frederick Street Character Area, but not within any of the City's Conservation Areas. It is centred on NGR: SK 9874 7156. The area of the site was first developed in the early 20th century, when rows of terraced houses were built further down the hill to the south. The Lincoln Archaeological Research Assessment (LARA) has classified Milman Road as having potential research agendas relating to the Prehistoric, Roman Military, Roman Colonia (The Greetwell Villa), Early Medieval (Greetwell villa estate and potential wic); and the High Medieval and Early Modern Eras. The scheme of archaeological monitoring was not successfully implemented. Pre-construct Archaeological Services attended the site strip, but was not recalled by the developer until after the completion of groundworks and erection of structures. As a result the potential archaeological resource of the site and heritage assets lost are unknown. A single undated pit containing what appeared to be hearth debris was the only archaeological feature encountered.
2015
 
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