Series: AD Archaeology Ltd unpublished report series

AD Archaeology Limited
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Year of Publication (Start): 2007
Year of Publication (End): 2017
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A Dickson
2007
J McKelvey
Trenching evaluation at High Fair, Wooler
2014
W Muncaster
A strip, map and record scheme was undertaken by AD Archaeology in May 2014 as an archaeological planning condition in advance of a proposed housing development. This archaeological scheme follows an earlier desk-based assessment (Welsh 2012) and geophysical survey (WYAS 2013), and represents the final mitigation of any potential impact of the development upon the archaeological resource. The archaeological strip and record of the site did not encounter any deposits or features of archaeological interest.
2014
J McKelvey
Evaluation trenching in advance of proposed housing development
2017
J McKelvey
Archaeological evaluation in advance of proposed housing development
2017
W Muncaster
AD Archaeology Ltd was commissioned to undertake an archaeological trenching evaluation in advance of a proposed development of the site as an extension of the existing long term car park. The evaluation trenches have confirmed that the system of linear anomalies identified by the earlier geophysical survey of the site by AD Archaeology represent furrows associated with ridge and furrow agricultural systems. It was suggested in the geophysical survey report that an earlier wider system of ridge and furrow, characterised as broad rigg (commonly of medieval origin) has been subsumed at least in the western portion of the field by latter narrow rigg of likely post-medieval date. The evaluation has demonstrated that the spacing or wavelength between furrows within the eastern end of the field was up to 9.5m (trench 6) and of the broad rigg type. In contrast, the furrows in the central and western portion of the field mainly measured between 4.5-5.4m (trenches 8, 10 and 14), although some wider spaced furrows in the central area (trench 11) may represent a remnant of an earlier broad rigg system. Trench 4 formed a transect across the two types of furrows. A gully (405) perhaps marked the edge of a broad rigg system in the eastern end of the trench which ran along the base of a furrow possibly defining a contemporary boundary. To the east of this line in trench 4, the furrows were more narrowly spaced.
2014
W Muncaster
AD Archaeology was commissioned to undertake an archaeological trenching evaluation in advance of a proposed development of land at East Sleekburn village (centred at NGR NZ 2874 8360). The evaluation trenches have established that the network of linear anomalies identified by the earlier geophysical survey of the site (AD Archaeology 2013b) were caused by cuts associated with field drainage rather than features of archaeological interest such as ditches or gullies. The truncated remains of furrows identified within several of the trenches (T.2, 3, 4, 7) probably represent a remnant of ridge and furrow originating from the medieval period. No other features of archaeological significance were recorded within any of the trenches and it is therefore recommended that no further archaeological mitigation is required prior to any proposed development within the site.
2013
W Muncaster
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken by AD Archaeology Ltd on behalf of Northumbrian Water Ltd (NWL), during the connection of a new residential supply from the existing water main in the roadside leading to Standwell Farm Cottage, Harlow Hill, Northumberland. The line of Hadrian's Wall is scheduled at this point. Scheduled Monument Consent was granted for the works subject to conditions which specified that no nationally important archaeological remains would be destroyed by the work, and that NWL would not proceed with any excavations that threaten such remains. No deposits or features of archaeological interest were encountered within the trench. Sandstone bedrock was encountered at a minimum of 0.13m below the road surface.
2013
W Muncaster
A small archaeological excavation was undertaken by AD Archaeology Ltd on behalf of Northumbrian Water Ltd (NWL), to enable the connection of a new residential supply from the existing water main within the roadside to The Bungalow, Harlow Hill, Northumberland. The line of Hadrian's Wall is scheduled at this point. Scheduled Monument Consent was granted for the works subject to conditions which specified that no nationally important archaeological remains would be destroyed by the work, and that NWL would not proceed with any excavations that threaten such remains. No deposits or features associated with Hadrian's Wall were encountered within the trench. The only feature of interest was a shallow cut identified at the northern end of the trench that appeared to be aligned with the existing road to the south. It's position along the frontage of the property boundaries of the village suggest it may be an associated gully running along this line. The stony layer underlying the path and extending on top of the silted cut may have been associated with a surface associated with the farm, predating the tarmac path and road surface.
2013
W Muncaster
An archaeological Watching Brief was undertaken by AD Archaeology on behalf of Newcastle City Council, at the junction of Woodside Avenue and Hexham Road, Throckley. The line of Hadrian's Wall, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Scheduled Ancient Monument, is known to lie beneath the southern carriageway of Hexham Road. It was suggested that sandstone fragments recorded during an earlier evaluation immediately below the tarmac road surface may have been associated with Hadrian's Wall with another stone layer representing the Military Road. A similar layer of sandstone fragments was observed during the watching brief, which were probably associated with the modern road and of no archaeological significance.
2013
 
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