ACCORD with the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology Group

ACCORD project, 2017

Data copyright © Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology Group, ACCORD project unless otherwise stated

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Primary contact

Dr Stuart Jeffrey
Research Fellow
Glasgow School of Art
Digital Design Studio
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G51 1EA
Scotland
Tel: +44 (0) 141 566 1465

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1042726
Sample Citation for this DOI

ACCORD project (2017) ACCORD with the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology Group [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1042726

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Overview

The ACCORD team worked with the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology (herein ACA) group from the 8th to the 10th of August 2014. The project was based in Kilchoan, West Ardnamurchan in Argyllshire. Together at Camas Nan Geall we recorded and modelled three headstones in a graveyard and a standing stone with Early Medieval carvings adjacent to this graveyard, and in the nearby town a graveslab in the Kilchoan Parish Churchyard, Kilchoan. We used the techniques Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and photogrammetry.

The group consists of mutual friends who officially formed as the group ACA in September 2013 after taking part in an Adopt-a-Monument surveying workshop. Membership is open and free, and all members are local residents. ACA are very active in documenting and recording heritage sites on the Ardnamurchan Peninsula; records are deposited with the Highland Environmental Records, appearing on Pastmap (http://pastmap.org.uk/). Prior to ACCORD members of the group have worked with the Ardnamurchan Transitions Project in partnership with Archaeology Scotland’s Adopt-a-Monument scheme (with the universities of Manchester and Leicester, and with CFA-Archaeology) which has been conducting excavations in the area over the past 9 years.

List of Participants in the ACCORD project:

  • Andrew Perkins (Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology)
  • Jim Caldwell (Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology)
  • Allyson Perkins (Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology)
  • Jonathan Haylett (Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology)
  • Wendy MacFadyen (Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology)
  • Stuart Jeffrey (Digital Design Studio, Glasgow School of Art)
  • Mhairi Maxwell (Digital Design Studio, Glasgow School of Art)
  • Cara Jones (Archaeology Scotland)

Description of Data-Capture Process:

For photogrammetry, data collection consisted of digital images captured largely with an AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm F3.5-5.6G on a Nikon D5300 DSLR camera, although other cameras were used. Before any images were taken, the camera and lens settings were set to automatic, with no flash and images captured at JPG fine quality (metadata for each image is provided in the accompanying excel spreadsheet). A total of 319 digital images were captured in order to create a photogrammetric model of a standing stone with Early Medieval carvings.

For reflectance transformation imaging, in all cases, data collection consisted of digital images captured with an 18-55mm Nikkor lens on a Nikon D5300 DSLR camera. Before any images were taken, the camera and lens settings were fixed so that each image was taken within controlled parameters, with no flash and images captured at JPG fine quality. We used the RTI builder software available from Cultural Heritage Imaging, which uses a polynomial texture mapping plugin. We used hand-held light sources for highlight based data capture and a shiny black sphere mounted on a tripod next to the object surface. To minimise light pollution data capture took place under a tarp. In total we took an average of 30 images to create each RTI using a LED light source.

Data available on the ADS from this project:

  • Photographs of co-production in action.
  • A summary statement of pre-existing and generated social value and significance related to the monuments recorded. This was co-written with the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology group.
  • A photogrammetric 3D model produced by the group with ACCORD of the Camas Nan Geall standing stone. This is made available as an interactive 3D PDF and also as an OBJ file from which you can 3D print.
  • Five Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) files produced by the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology group of three headstones in a graveyard adjacent to the standing stone at Camas Nan Geall and a graveslab in the Kilchoan Parish Churchyard, Kilchoan.
  • Archival copies of the original digital photographs used to create the photogrammetric models and the RTI images.
  • Additional material provided by the group to be included in the archive; two landscape photographs (in JPG format) showing Camas Nan Geall taken by Jonathan Haylett, and detail of the 1806 map (in TIFF format) illustrated by William Bald, in care of Ardnamurchan Estate.
  • Metadata for the above.

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All ACCORD datasets provided via the ADS are licensed under a Creative Commons CC BY 3.0 license


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