Profiling the Profession

Landward Research Ltd, 2014

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Landward Research Ltd (2014) Profiling the Profession [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1024571

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Introduction

Comprehensive Labour Market Intelligence for the archaeological profession has now been gathered for the fourth time in the series of Profiling the Profession studies. This baseline survey used the same fundamental methodology that was previously employed in 1997-98, 2002-03 and 2007-08, and consequently a time-series dataset has been compiled which allows trends to be identified with increasing confidence.

The previous labour market intelligence gathering exercise for the sector (in 2007-08) was undertaken immediately before the effects of significant global and national economic changes began to affect archaeological employment. The economic transformation since 2007-08 significantly affected employment in archaeology, resulting in the sector being considerably smaller in 2012-13 than it was in 2007-08.