Lyman, R. L. (2005). Analyzing cut marks:. J Archaeol Sci 32 (12). Vol 32(12), pp. 1722-1732.

Title
Title
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Title:
Analyzing cut marks:
Subtitle
Subtitle
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Subtitle:
lessons from artiodactyl remains in the northwestern United States
Issue
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Issue:
J Archaeol Sci 32 (12)
Series
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Series:
Journal of Archaeological Science
Volume
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Volume:
32 (12)
Page Start/End
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Page Start/End:
1722 - 1732
Biblio Note
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Abstract
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Abstract:
The author argues that many studies of the human behavioural significance of frequencies of cut-marked mammal bones focus on determining the so-called `butchering pattern', and that few analysts comment on the tremendous range of variation in frequencies and anatomical distributions of cut marks across multiple assemblages of remains of a taxon. Such variation is evident even when faunal remains are associated with technologically, temporally, and environmentally similar cultures. This kind of variation is illustrated with frequencies of cut marked bone specimens comprising major limb joints of two artiodactyl genera from two sites in the northwestern United States. Three hypotheses are tested. The first and second hypotheses (one per genus) predict that the frequencies of cut-marked remains of a taxon from one site will match those frequencies evident on the remains of the same taxon at the other site. Both hypotheses are falsified. The third hypothesis is that remains of the larger taxon at each site will display more cut marks than the remains of the smaller taxon at each site. This hypothesis is statistically falsified at one site but not the other. Refutation of the hypotheses suggests that well-founded interpretations of frequencies of cut-marked remains may require unique kinds of contextual data.
Author
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Author:
R L Lyman
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2005
Locations
Locations
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Subjects / Periods:
Faunal Remains (Auto Detected Subject))
Bone (Auto Detected Subject))
Cutmarked Mammal Bones (Auto Detected Subject))
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BIAB (The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB))
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URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03054403
Created Date
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Created Date:
14 Mar 2006