McClymont, E. L., Mauquoy, D., Yeloff, D., Broekens, P., Geel, van, B., Charman, D. J., Pancost, R. D., Chambers, F. M. and Evershed, R. P. (2008). The disappearance of Sphagnum imbricatum from Butterburn Flow, UK. The Holocene 18 (6). Vol 18(6), pp. 991-1002. https://doi.org/10.1177/0959683608093537.

Title
Title
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Title:
The disappearance of Sphagnum imbricatum from Butterburn Flow, UK
Issue
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Issue:
The Holocene 18 (6)
Series
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Series:
The Holocene
Volume
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Volume:
18 (6)
Number of Pages
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Number of Pages:
165
Page Start/End
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Page Start/End:
991 - 1002
Biblio Note
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Journal
Abstract
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Abstract:
The disappearance of the previously abundant moss species Sphagnum imbricatum has been investigated at Butterburn Flow, northern England, using organic geochemical, elemental, macrofossil, pollen and testate amoebae analyses. Variations in the assemblage of peat-forming plants were traded using the macro-fossil distributions as well as the relative chain lengths of n-alkanes and concentrations of 5-n-alkyl resourcinols and triterpols. No significant changes to the vegetation assemblage could be detected prior to the loss of S. imbricatum. Variations in water depth were reconstructed using a testate amoebae transfer function and inferred qualitatively using bulk elemental composition and biomarkers for changing redox conditions in the bog subsurface: the degree of isomerization in the C3 hopares, and the concentration of bishomopherol and archol. Pollen analysis reconstructed the landscape surrounding the mire and revealed evidence for human disturbance. The results suggest that bog surface wetness increased with the transition from Sphagnum imbricatum to Sphagum magelliarium, but the increase was not large and emph{S. imbricatum} coincides with increasing human disturbance surrounding the bog, which may have altered nutrient inputs to the bog surface from agriculturally derived dust, to the detriment of S. imbricatum but to the benefit of S. magelliarium and Eriohome vagination. It is proposed that the stresses imposed by the combination of changing nutrient inputs and a rapidly rising water-table drove the disappearance of S. imbricatum for Butterburn Flow at c. cal. AD 1300.
Author
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Author:
Erin L McClymont
Dimitri Mauquoy
Dan Yeloff
Peter Broekens
Bas Geel, van
Daniel J Charman
Richard D Pancost
Frank M Chambers
Richard P Evershed
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2008
Locations
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Subjects / Periods:
Organic Geochemical Elemental Macrofossil Pollen (Auto Detected Subject))
Archol Pollen Analysis (Auto Detected Subject))
Ad 1300 (Auto Detected Temporal)
Magelliarium (Auto Detected Subject))
Emphsphagnum Imbricatum (Auto Detected Subject))
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BIAB (biab_online)
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0959683608093537
Created Date
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Created Date:
20 May 2010