Williams, H. (2011). The sense of being seen. Journal of Social Archaeology. Vol 11(1), pp. 99-121. https://doi.org/10.1177/1469605310381034.

Title
Title
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Title:
The sense of being seen
Subtitle
Subtitle
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Subtitle:
Ocular effects at Sutton Hoo
Issue
Issue
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Issue:
Journal of Social Archaeology
Series
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Series:
Journal of Social Archaeology
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
11 (1)
Page Start/End
Page Start/End
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Page Start/End:
99 - 121
Biblio Note
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Biblio Note
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Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Journal
Abstract
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Abstract:
This article considers the mnemonic agency of the art adorning a diverse range of artefacts recovered from the early seventh-century AD burial chamber constructed within a ship beneath Mound 1 at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, UK. The study identifies a theme linking the prestige artefacts placed within this 'princely' grave: many are covered with eyes or eye-like forms, and argues that this ocular quality to the art '” not simply visually striking but affording the sense of animated, watching presences '” was integral to the selection of artefacts for burial. It is argued that the beastly, monstrous and humanoid eyes commemorated the dead person as all-seeing. Those witnessing the staged wrapping and consignment of the artefacts were afforded the sense of being all-seen. By exploring art in this elite mortuary context, the article presents a case study in the early medieval archaeology of the senses.
Author
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Author:
Howard Williams ORCID icon
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2011
ISBN
ISBN
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ISBN:
1469-6053
Locations
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Subjects / Periods:
Ad (Auto Detected Temporal)
Artefacts (Auto Detected Subject))
Burial (Auto Detected Subject))
Grave (Auto Detected Subject))
Burial Chamber (Auto Detected Subject))
Medieval (Auto Detected Temporal)
Source
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Source:
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BIAB (biab_online)
Relations
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Relations:
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1469605310381034
Created Date
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Created Date:
26 Jul 2012