Taylor, A., Duhig, C. and Hines, J. (1998). An Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Oakington, Cambridgeshire. Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society 86. Vol 86, pp. 57-90. https://doi.org/10.5284/1073244. Cite this via datacite

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
An Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Oakington, Cambridgeshire
Issue
Issue
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Issue:
Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society 86
Series
Series
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Series:
Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
86
Page Start/End
Page Start/End
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Page Start/End:
57 - 90
Downloads
Downloads
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Downloads:
PCAS_LXXXVI_1998_057-090_Tayloretal.pdf (3 MB) : Download
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ADS, CC-BY 4.0 or CC-BY 4.0 NC.
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ADS Terms of Use and Access
DOI
DOI
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DOI
https://doi.org/10.5284/1073244
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Journal
Abstract
Abstract
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Abstract:
Digging for the creation of nursery gardens in the 1920's exposed several graves containing four skeletons, one male with a spear and shield-boss over his head and three coloured glass beads. Villagers also noted lots of bone on the surface of the field. In 1993, excavations for the construction of a playground exposed more human bones and a sixth-century brooch. Two ditches of early prehistoric date and flints from the Mesolithic and Neolithic were noted beneath one of the graves. There were twenty-five graves in total containing twenty-six individuals, as two were in a shared grave. Other bone evidence suggests that the cemetery may have contained more than thirty-five individuals, many of which were children under the age of twelve. It is noteworthy that there is a high prevalence of cruciform and small long brooches in the female graves as in the cemetery at Girton College. This type of brooch is particularly characteristic of the costume of Anglian women. It is thought that the cemetery dates somewhere between 500--70 AD which is somewhat supported by the find of a square headed brooch produced locally around this time. All artefacts are typical of a sixth-century Anglian cemetery although the individuals from this site do share particular hereditary peculiarities. There is an appendix on `skeletal remains -- methods and glossary' (89).
Author
Author
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Author:
Alison Taylor
Corinne Duhig
John Hines
Other Person/Org
Other Person/Org
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Other Person/Org:
Deborah M F Furness (Abstract author)
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
1998
Locations
Locations
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Subjects / Periods:
Spear (Auto Detected Subject)
Neolithic (MIDAS)
Skeletal Remains (Auto Detected Subject)
Long Brooches (Auto Detected Subject)
Nursery Gardens (Auto Detected Subject)
Grave (Auto Detected Subject)
Human Bones (Auto Detected Subject)
Flints (Auto Detected Subject)
Bone (Auto Detected Subject)
Mesolithic (MIDAS)
Graves (Auto Detected Subject)
Skeletons (Auto Detected Subject)
Brooch (Auto Detected Subject)
Anglian (Auto Detected Temporal)
Ditches (Auto Detected Subject)
Cemetery (Auto Detected Subject)
Early Prehistoric (MIDAS)
Glass Beads Villagers (Auto Detected Subject)
Source
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Source:
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ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
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Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
20 Jan 2002