Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
14
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Editor
Editor
The editor of the publication or report
Editor:
Sarah Semple
Howard Williams ORCID icon
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2007
Note
Note
Extra information on the publication or report.
Note:
Editorial Expansion: Special issue on Early Medieval Mortuary Practices
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
BIAB (biab_online)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
01 Jul 2014

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Reference record only Howard Williams
1 - 11
Introduction to the special volume looking at discoveries, methods and theories in early medieval mortuary archaeology, interpretation, debating death and identity, burial rites and artefacts, monuments and landscape, excavation reports, wider context, public archaeology of early medieval graves and ethical debates.
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Reference record only Heinrich G H Härke
12 - 18
Paper seeking to answer the question raised at a conference 'what is the current state of thinking on the inference of ethnicity and race from archaeological evidence?'. Au/SH
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Reference record only Susanne Hakenbeck
19 - 27
In this paper the author tries to bridge the sophisticated approaches used by historians with an archaeological approach to ethnicity and identity. The paper concludes that the evidence suggests that early medieval ethnicity in the late half of the fifth and first half of the sixth century indicates a highly complex network of identities, ranging from the super-regional to the personal and close ties with other aspects of social structure.
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Reference record only R Hoggett
28 - 37
This paper explores three ways in which the burial record of Anglo-Saxon East Anglia can be used to chart the spread of Christianity throughout the region. Attention is paid to those material characteristics which typify a Christian burial in the Middle Ages - inhumation, deposition without grave-goods and west-east orientation. It is argued that it is possible to use the adoption of these rites to trace the progress of the conversion, albeit with certain limitations.
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Reference record only Zoe Delvin
38 - 46
The aim of the paper is to set out some preliminary arguments from ongoing research on the application of theories of memory to early medieval mortuary practices. Firstly, the paper discusses the ways in which researchers have previously defined social memory, before attempting a working definition suitable for the study. Secondly, the paper will examine how objects, and specifically portable grave goods, have a part to play in the processes of social memory in a mortuary context. Finally, the paper suggests some ways in which ideas presented in the paper might inform our understanding of early Anglo-Saxon burial practices. The ideas in the paper are expanded upon in the author's doctoral thesis.
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Reference record only Rebecca L Gowland
56 - 65
This paper presents the first attempt [as far as the author is aware] to systematically compare mortuary variability, in relation to sex and age from both late Roman and early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries. The paper shows that although there is no straightforward relationship between grave goods and social identity, the analysis does reveal significant patterns of deposition. The paper also includes a brief critique of the role of the skeleton in inferring ethnicity.
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Reference record only Howard Williams
66 - 91
This paper starts with a review of toilet implements from a selection of inhumation cemeteries from across England before demonstrating the contrasting character of toilet items found in broadly contemporary cremation rites. Through the analysis the author argues that the contrast between the rites indicates a limited significance for inhumation rites, but central importance for toilet implements in Early Anglo-Saxon cremation rites.
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Reference record only Chris Fern
92 - 109
This paper details the differing attitudes towards horses within two early Anglo-Saxon funerary rites with the aim of understanding the inspiration and meaning that underpinned them.
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Reference record only Sue Harrington
110 - 116
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Reference record only Jo Buckberry
117 - 129
Paper arguing that burial practices were not egalitarian in the late Anglo-Saxon period but were instead influenced by social identity.
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Reference record only Annia Kristina Cherryson
130 - 142
Paper assessing the evidence for post-burial disturbances of the deceased in early medieval cemeteries in Wessex, with particular attention given to the differences between the levels of post-burial disturbances seen in field cemeteries and churchyards, as well as to a consideration of the fate of the displaced human remains, from their deposition in charnel pits to the use of displaced skulls to support the skulls of later burials. The paper also examines the influence of the Church and the re-emergence of urban centres on the changes in the post-burial treatment of the dead during the early medieval period. The paper concludes with a consideration of the evidence for the post-burial treatment of the body with respect to both the views of the Church in the treatment of the deceased and the belief in the literal resurrection of the body.
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Reference record only Stuart Brookes
143 - 153
This paper develops the concept of the social and experimental landscape by considering the organisation of funerary monuments with respect to human movement. An analysis of the distribution of Early Anglo-Saxon burials in East Kent demonstrates a close correlation with terrestrial and maritime routeways. Place-name evidence and the topographic positioning of sites is explored to stress the significance of funerary monument visibility. The role of routeways in structuring engagement with the landscape is discussed, with consideration given to how these were increasingly manipulated, restricted and contested by an emergent social order.
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Reference record only David Petts
163 - 172
Article exploring the discursive relationship between texts and material culture in early medieval Wales to illustrate that both texts, graves and monuments formed part of an emerging ideology and practice about the role of burial and commemoration in society from the ninth to eleventh centuries AD.
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Reference record only Stephen H Harrison
173 - 182
Paper that starts with an overview on the linguistic, historical and archaeological evidence for Scandinavian activity in the British Isles and investigates two forms of site re-use on near contemporary Christian sites and 'ancient' sites, which at the more general level can be seen as politically or religiously inspired. The paper concludes that the care with which sites for re-use were selected suggests a familiarity with the local environment and illustrates close links which those creating burials had already established with the local polity and landscape.
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Reference record only Dawn M Hadley
194 - 203
This paper focuses on the relationships of rural cemeteries to settlements in which they were located. The analysis reveals that Anglo-Saxon cemeteries were often ephemeral features in the rural landscape, probe to abandonment and often given over to domestic occupation or agriculture.
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Reference record only Philippa Patrick
Charles A I French
Christine Osborne
204 - 237
Details of a site where 32 skeletons were excavated from 30 grave pits and one stone coffin of probable Roman date, with fragments of four to seven more bodies present. Includes detailed osteological report and specialists reports on non-Saxon features, the flint assemblage, skeletal remains, grave artefacts, iron artefacts, Roman copper alloy artefacts, Anglo-Saxon jewellery, a single lead artefact, beads, bone artefacts (including combs) and pottery. SH
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Reference record only Catriona Gibson
238 - 350
During the late spring and summer of 1999 an archaeological excavation was carried out on c. 1.25ha of land by Herefordshire Archaeological Trust at Minerva Business Park near Peterborough, Cambridgeshire. One area produced evidence predominantly of Iron Age date, comprising pits, ditches and a post hole structure. A second area contained an early Anglo-Saxon cemetery with 28 urned and two unurned cremation burials dating to between the fifth and sixth centuries AD and 34 inhumations dating to between the late fifth and early seventh centuries AD. Both types of burial were provided with grave goods, and some of the burials were richly furnished. Includes detailed report on features and specialist reports on the cremated and inhumation skeletal remains, pottery, grave goods, coinage, slag and animal bone. SH
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