Archaeologia Aeliana Series 4

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 4
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
46
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
1968
Source
Source
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Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard Wainwright
1 - 4
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon George Jobey
5 - 50
NU 1026. One large and five small cairns were excavated. The large cairn yielded three Beaker inhumations and two cremations, one in an Enlarged Food Vessel, the other unaccompanied. A final burial may have been inserted into the cairn during the 3rd cent AD. The 14C date for the earliest Beaker burial is 1670 + 50 BC and the second Beaker burial followed closely on this. The third inhumation, accompanied by a late type of Beaker, was probably inserted into a cairn already raised over the first two and, at this stage, perhaps c 1500 BC, the cairn could have been enlarged by the addition of a well constructed kerb. The true nature of four of the small cairns was not entirely resolved and they may have been no more than the results of field clearance. A fifth apparently covered a grave, lacking any grave goods, but for carbonised material from this there is a 14C date of 2890 + 90 BC which poses a problem in itself. Further work had to be postponed. Appended are field observations on possible enclosed cremation cemeteries and on cairnfields generally in north Northumberland. Au(abr)
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Norman McCord
George Jobey
51 - 68
New discoveries from the air begin to show the extent to which early lowland settlement took place; forty-two new sites lying between the rivers Tyne and Wansbeck are catalogued. All but two are rectangular enclosures, some at least of the single-ditched examples being paralleled by known RB native sites. The small two-ditched enclosures present the appearance of Roman fortlets, but are sometimes too far from the road network to bear this interpretation. Two sites with widely-spaced inner and outer ditches seem to be homesteads. There is increasing evidence for pre-Roman use of rectangular enclosures; but none of those catalogued here match the square-ditched burial sites of Yorkshire. Associated field systems have not been identified.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Dorothy Charlesworth
69 - 74
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon J Tait
John Pearson Gillam
75 - 97
Extensions to the local grammar school have led to work since 1963 by archaeologists and mechanical excavators on the site of the fort. A granary/storehouse in SE corner of the fort, the line of the fort wall plus three ditches, extra-mural buildings and parade ground have been established. Pottery, coarse and samian, suggests a foundation date associated with the re-establishment of Hadrian's Wall in Period 1b; from then to the end of Roman rule in the north, occupation appears unbroken. BLC
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
Joyce Hooley
97 - 114
An examination of the division of labour between legions on the building of the wall uses the structural evidence of turrets, milecastles and the curtain together with epigraphic material but draws different conclusions from those of Stevens. Different structures and lengths can be attributed to different legions in the first stage of wall construction and in the building of forts when legions were re-deployed. A review of the evidence suggests AD 122 for the start of wall building, 124 for the dislocation of the first stage and 126-7 for the decision to narrow the wall. Evidence for the building of the Turf wall is uncertain without further excavation. BLC
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Charles Manser Daniels
115 - 126
Preliminary report. An iron-bound wooden chest contained a hoard of objects best interpreted as the contents of an armourer's workshop, collected together hurriedly and hidden under the floorboards of the fort which was destroyed by fire some time after AD 98. Of the chest itself only the angle-irons survived. The contents, still undergoing preservation and study; include a metal-bound wooden tankard, fragments of writing tablets (illegible), fabric and leather, rope, bone objects, glass gaming counters, beads, an empty scabbard and parts of a stool. The largest part of the hoard consisted of iron tools, spearheads, nails, scrap metal and portions of legionary cuirasses. The presence of legionary material at an otherwise auxiliary fort is paralleled at Newstead.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon G W I Hodgson
127 - 162
The object of the comparison is to understand the economy of the two sites. Part 1 summarises the relative numbers of species and their ages at death. Corstopitum bones include data collected earlier. The sheep were similiar to the Soay type, slaughtered in their second year. The cattle were Bos longifrons and the pigs a long-legged domestic type, the horses about 14½ hands maximum height. In order of abundance, the species were ox, sheep, pig, horse, red deer at both sites (cf Woodcutts). Part 2 examines the relative numbers as a guide to the economy. Although comparison is not exact because of incomplete excavation and different assessing methods, tables are given of relative frequencies of food species from sixty ancient sites, Mesolithic to medieval. The ages at slaughter of Catcote and Corstopitum sheep are tabulated and histograms of bone size-ranges provided. Size-diversity of ancient cattle in general is discussed and a "neolithic ox" postulated, intermediate between the aurochs and the "Celtic ox" which gave place after Roman times to larger and variant forms. B W
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Barbara Harbottle
163 - 224
NZ 248637. In 1307 the Carmelite Friary was moved to a site at the south-western edge of the town, previously occupied by the Friars of the Sack for about forty years. The history of the two friaries is given, and the post-Dissolution history of the area is traced in detail. The excavation uncovered the south wall of the quire and the nave; it was probably of late 13th cent date, erected by the earlier Friars. Previous investigation had suggested that a north aisle had been subsequently added to this nave. The cloister lay to the south of the church with four walks and three ranges, their positions being established by this excavation. The east range formed the nucleus for a 17th cent house. Material discussed in the appendices includes Roman coarse pottery (2nd-early 3rd cent), medieval pottery (mainly 13th-14th cent), post-medieval pottery with a wide range of 16th and 17th cent imports, and two wooden fences lining a latrine trench. LASB
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Roger Howell
225 - 228
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon R F Tuck
229 - 272
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 273 - 291
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon H Russell Robinson
273 - 275
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon J Tait
275 - 281
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Smith
281 - 284
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Smith
284 - 291
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 293 - 301
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon George Jobey
293 - 302
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon C A Zealand
293 - 302
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Norma R Whitcomb
293 - 302
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 303 - 309
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Sydney Midlebrook
303 - 304
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon George Jobey
305 - 306
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon John C Mann
306 - 308
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon John Philipson
308 - 309
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 311 - 320
No Abstract icon