Archaeologia Aeliana Series 4

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 4
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
50
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
1972
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon H Aubrey W Burl
N W Jones
1 - 14
NT 774009. Total excavation of a four-poster stone circle (see 72/1372) is reported. As commonly found in four-posters, the SW stone was the most massive. It and the three others stood on the circumference of a 14ft-diameter circle whose central area was occupied by a probable ring-cairn surrounding a much-disturbed ?cremation space. Acid soil conditions would have destroyed any pottery, and charcoal was restricted to flecks only. A single scraper was found, and the stones bore no cupmarks. No relationship with Thom's megalithic yard was observed, and the lack of good celestial alignments confirms Thom's findings in relation to this class of monument. The Three Kings was probably erected by ten to twelve people during the later 2nd millennium BC.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Colin B Burgess
15 - 69
NT 977371 etc. Excavations were carried out in a number of rock shelters and overhangs along Fell Sandstone crag lines in the Wooler region. Site A at Goatscrag proved to be an EBA cemetery yielding four cremation burials, two in Enlarged Food Vessels, amidst abundant pits and ?post-holes. Numbers of probably earlier flints were found. Parallels for the site and pottery are discussed. Goatscrag B yielded similar flints and a number of rock-cut pits possibly connected with the activities at Site A. One site at Roughting Linn yielded only modern material. A second seemed unsuitable on geological grounds, and the same may apply to the Raven's Crag sites investigated. Overhangs at Bowden Doors produced a quantity of flints, and these and the Goatscrag flints are discussed. Some, and possibly all, of this flint material is Mesolithic. Au. Appendices treat pottery, flints, cremated bones and charcoals
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon George Jobey
71 - 80
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
81 - 144
NY 859711. Four periods of occupation were revealed, beginning with ploughmarks in the natural clay. There followed a ?work-camp for troops building Hadrian's Wall. The Vallum was next constructed across the site, and succeeded by the fort built later in Hadrian's reign. Evidence of two or three phases of rebuilding was noted in the praetentura in 1967. In the HQ building three phases of rebuilding were discovered (mid- or late 2nd century to 4th century). Limited investigation at the S gate showed a complete blocking. There was no evidence for destruction by enemy action at any time, and pottery demonstrates occupation into the last quarter of 4th century. Au(abr)
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Roger F Miket
Valerie A Maxfield
145 - 178
NY 821706. Construction was of standard A on a river-cobble foundation. The E doorway had been altered once and finally blocked. Demolition of the turret followed (?Severan reorganisation) and its stones were used to fill the turret-recess in the curtain wall. The relationship of turret-wing walls to curtain presents an unsolved problem. Pottery is predominantly of Wall Period IA although the floor-level was twice raised; scanty IB pottery suggests only brief or spasmodic reoccupation, and a little 3rd century material may relate to the demolition. An inscription of Legio VI, unless it relates to an otherwise unattested late rebuilding, calls into question the ascription of this turret to Leg XX Valeria Victrix.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Anthony R Birley
179 - 189
Recent writings (abstracts 68/067, 71/1042, 72/1451 & 72/1453) have disputed the orthodox view of invasion at AD 196-7, and have assigned the known damage to AD 205 or later. Re-examination of these arguments and the texts (principally Herodian) on which they are based reveals several flaws, and while there could well have been serious damage c 207, this does not preclude other damage ten years before when Lupus had to buy off the Maeatae.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Peter V Webster
191 - 203
This oxidised fabric occurs in a fairly standard range of forms among which tankards are prominent. Although concentrated in the Severn Basin, this ware is also found on Hadrian's Wall, where its virtual restriction to milecastles and turrets in wall-miles 35-54 during Wall Period I indicates the operation of a small and short-term contract. The evident separation of patrol from fort supplies confirms the distinct nature of these units, and the pursuit of "minority wares" might reveal further evidence for contracts in the military
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Norman H Brewster
205 - 216
Much of the ware described as "Rhenish" actually comes from Central Gaul, probably Lezoux. True Rhenish is always a fine, hard fabric, red or grey (or red/grey sandwich) with a glossy dark surface. In Britain this fabric occurs only in beaker forms, usually indented and rouletted, or with mottos. Dating is late 2nd/3rd centuries. The two-handled cups from Corbridge and elsewhere, and the barbotine-decorated beakers of Gillam form 48, are probably from Lezoux and of late Antonine to mid-3rd century date. There is some evidence for true Rhenish copies of Lezoux forms.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Grace Simpson
217 - 233
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon James T Lang
235 - 248
NZ 349070. Though there are literary references to Sockburn before the 10th century the sculpture from the ruined pre-Conquest church is not earlier than the Viking period. One of the hogbacks shows the story of Tyr and Fenrir. Such an interpretation is supported by eddaic depictions on two other carvings from the site, fragments of a hogback and of a shaft, showing the proffering of a drinking horn. Parallels on the Gotland stones suggest that these carvings reflect an heroic aristocratic cult at Sockburn associated with Odin. The interaction of pagan and Christian elements on carvings at Gosforth and Dynna (Norway) is also examined. R N B
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Philip W Dixon
249 - 258
Review-article (see 72/1504). The volume makes a substantial contribution to the study of these summer and winter dwellings of the 16th-17th century Borderers, and the practice of transhumance is skilfully documented. Some wrong conclusions are drawn, however, and the organisation of shieling grounds would have repaid closer attention. Only the smallest bastles are described, and too homogeneous a view of Border society is presented. Appended is a list of additional bastles.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon John G Hurst
259 - 262
A dish fragment found in site clearance is typical of the slipware made at Wanfried in Hesse, Germany, from c 1575-1635. This pottery occurs in several sites on the S and E coasts of England.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon D P Kirby
263 - 275
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 277 - 290
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
277 - 280
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon L G Harris
Moraig Ovens
Colin B Burgess
280 - 282
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Martin Henig
282 - 287
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon George Jobey
287 - 290
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 291 - 295
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Joan Weyman
C H Tonge
291
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon George Jobey
291 - 294
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Norman Shiel
294 - 295
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 297 - 301
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard Wainwright
297 - 298
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon John C Mann
298 - 300
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Rosemary J Cramp
300 - 301
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 303 - 308
No Abstract icon