Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
40
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2011
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
Article Title Sort Order no arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order up arrow
Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Clive Waddington
Peter D Marshall
Dana Millson
1 - 40
In the past 30 years, fieldwork in the Milfield Basin has revealed increasing evidence for Neolithic activity. This paper draws together all the available radiocarbon dates associated with Neolithic and Beaker period ceramics, together with a new analysis of the Neolithic and Beaker period pottery of the region. The findings provide the beginnings of a dated ceramic sequence for the area between Yorkshire and Scotland, whilst also tying in the ceramic chronology with the wider national picture. In addition the paper highlights the identification of Beaker period ceramics derived from preceding indigenous Neolithic forms, but that are not Beaker pottery. There ceramics have been termed 'Neolithic derivative' and are viewed as fill the gap, providing the typological link, between later Neolithic ceramics and Early Bronze Age ceramics such as Food Vessels and Urns.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon G Brogan
Nick Hodgson
41 - 84
Geophysical survey and evaluation trenching between 2003 and 2007 at Mountjoy, on an escarpment 1 km south-east of Durham City, revealed a ditch, bifurcating to form two arms, which possibly represented part of an irregularly shaped enclosure at least 0.75 ha in area. A terminal suggested the presence of an entrance facing south-east. Radiocarbon dates from material in the lowest parts of the ditches and from one of the timbers indicate use in the period 1600-1300 cal BC. The mounment is the first site of its date to be recognised in the region and attests the use in north Britain of large-scale non-domestic enclosure in the middle Bronze Age. After about 1300 cal BC the ditches were not maintained and woodland regeneated over the site.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard J Carlton
85 - 115
Excavations at Harehaugh hillfort in Coquetdale, Northumberland, were carried out in 2002 as part of a wider project to determine the rate at which the monument was being damaged by erosion and how this was impacting upon significant archaeological remains. The results of the excavations and an associated 10-year programme of erosion-scar monitoring indicate that erosion is having a very significant impact upon archaeological remains, some of which remain well preserved with the potential to reveal important information. The excavations are described, and the article finishes with some comments on the significance and potential of the hillfort and its environs, and an attempt is made to place it in the context of regional Iron Age studies, particularly in the light of recent contextual surveys of hillforts in upland Northumberland and discoveries of large lowland sites to the south.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Humphrey G Welfare
117 - 130
The earthworks of a Roman fortlet, and those of a second enclosure which seems to be a detached annexe, are described and set in context. There is no direct evidence for the date of the construction of the fortlet, but a brief survey of broadly analogous sites in northern England and southern Scotland suggests that a late first-century context would be appropriate. Longshaws seems to have been one of a small number of sites across the Border counties that may have been put in place to support a network of patrols during the early phases of the occupation. It is possible that tents may have occupied the interior, and that the annexe contained the horses. The conscious use of natural defences in the choice of the sites of fortlets and of forts is common and has not been given sufficient emphasis.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Jennifer Proctor
131 - 153
An archaeological excavation undertaken ahead of the redevelopment of Trinity School, Benwell, on the eastern side of the extra-mural area of Benwell Roman fort, revealed several phases of activity dating from the Roman period onwards. The earliest feature, a metalled hollow-way, may represent part of a Roman track leading down the valley side to the River Tyne. The limited artefactual assemblage suggests that the boundary ditches enclosed an area utilised for agricultural purposes. The small pottery assemblage suggests that the activity dated principally from the second century AD with limited activity into the late third century. Later phases of archaeological activity at the site relate to medieval and post-medieval agricultural use of the land.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Frances McIntosh
155 - 182
Brooch finds are plentiful and so provide a data set from Roman Britain that is both widespread and representative of the different settlement types. In this paper, data from urban and rural areas in the north and south of England are compared. The data show that brooch use varied, both between different settlement types and within different parts of the country. Regional brooch-types are identified and future studies suggested.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Robin Tait
183 - 197
The burgage patterns in three north of England boroughs, Alnwick, Berwick-upon-Tweed and Cockermouth, have been examined. Plot widths and the positions of the access paths to the plot backlands were studied cartographically, using early Ordnance Survey Town plans. The north of England patterns were found to have a great deal in common with those in a number of Scottish burghs. The similarities are reviewed and discussed. Plot patterns in the north of England exhibit characteristics differing significantly from those in the Midlands and further south.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Erlend Hindmarch
199 - 222
Excavations at 119-125 Marygate, Berwick-upon-Tweed (centred on NGR NT 9970 5303) have revealed evidence for the development of the site from the 13th or 14th centuries through to the 19th century. The history of development on this small plot mirrors the development of the town itself. The artefact assemblage from the site is one of the largest recovered from a single investigation within Berwick and the results have greatly added to the corpus of information with regard to the town's past and development.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon A F Roberts
223 - 242
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Eric Clavering
Alan Rounding
243 - 258
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 259 - 276
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Christopher Tolan-Smith
Myra Tolan-Smith
259 - 267
This short paper publishes the more significant of finds made during the course of several projects involving fieldwalking along the Tyne Valley and casual finds made by local farmers. The finds have been deposited at the Great North Museum.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Lindsay Allason-Jones
Frances McIntosh
267 - 276
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 277 - 281
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Humphrey G Welfare
277
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
277 - 278
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
278 - 280
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Humphrey G Welfare
280
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Peter F Ryder
280 - 281
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Grace McCombie
281 - 282
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Roger W Fern
283 - 296
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon
No Abstract icon