Series: Archaeo-Environment Ltd unpublished report series

Archaeo-Environment Ltd
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Primary Contact: Caroline Hardie
Associated OrganisationArchaeo-Environment Ltd
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Year of Publication (Start): 2004
Year of Publication (End): 2013
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Hurworth is a substantial village on the north bank of the River Tees laid out around a village green. In October 2007 a watching brief was carried out during the excavation of foundations for a new domestic property in the curtilage of No. 57a The Green. The watching brief provided evidence of a deeply culverted beck running from north-west to south-east, and visible on maps from 1839 onwards. It would seem at some point in the 20th century this was diverted into a pipe culvert, with the open culvert backfilled to provide a level garden. Based on the evidence from the evaluation the development appears to have had a negligible impact on the the archaeology.
2008
Archaeo-Environment Ltd were commissioned by Sunderland City Council to carry out an archaeological assessment on land to the west of Barnes Park as part of a proposal to relocate a council depot currently within Barnes Park. This relocation is as a result of the proposed restoration of Barnes Park. Although no sites significant enough to prevent the development from taking place were identified, a number of issues relating largly to the previous agricultural use of the land were noted. These required either consideration in the final design, or further archaeological work.
2008
P Middleton
Archaeo-Environment Ltd (AE) undertook an historic buildings survey of Balliol College Farm, Glenfield Road, Longbenton, North Tyneside (NZ269691). This work was undertaken in support of a planning application to construct 42 new homes on the site of the farm, necessitating the demolition of all existing buildings, except for two workers cottages. Balliol College Farm is an interesting example of a mid to late 19th century farm whose design incorporates a number of the key advances in farm layout and production technologies made over the preceding hundred years. Built primarily for intensified beef production, the layout of the farm was governed by the need to provide extensive space to house cattle, so minimise movement and weight loss and maximise the collection of manure for fertilising the fields. In accordance with this, the E-shaped farm was divided into three sections; the cattle byres and stalls on the east side, the machinery and stables on the west side and crop storage and processing in the central, T-shaped, barn range.
2007
Archaeo-Environment Ltd. were commissioned by Bolam Parish Meeting to appraise and report on the archaeological resource and historic landscape of the village and its environs, as part of a proposal to have the village designated a conservation area. Bolam and its immediate environs include a scheduled ancient monument, two listed buildings, and a number of well preserved earthworks and landscape features exemplifying the medieval and later agricultural landscape. It has also been the subject of a number of published medieval village and settlement studies. In summary the case for conservation area status seems well founded. The village has changed very little in form from the 1st edition Ordnance Survey mapping of 1860, which in itself is clearly an excellent example of a
2009
C Hardie
P Middleton
A Conservation Statement to assist the County Council in finding a new use for the site without losing its unique qualities. Chester Farm is a unique cultural asset of both regional and national importance. It encapsulates over 2000 years of Northamptonshire's past in its 34 hectares of farm and former parkland. Northamptonshire County Council, as owner, has undertaken the challenge of finding a way forward for the site, which is no longer viable as a farm in its own right. The key aim is to provide a sustainable future for the site which conserves its historic character and improves public accessibility and enjoyment for all. It is vital that any decision regarding the future use and development of Chester Farm should be based on a sound understanding of the site and what it is that makes it significant. This Conservation Statement describes the site's various archaeological, historic and natural environment features and periods of development from prehistoric to modern times. It summarises where we need to know more in order to enhance understanding and care of the site. It describes the value attached to the site by members of the public and other stakeholders. The regulatory and planning context is explained. The Statement of Significance forms a key section, providing an assessment of what it is that makes the site so important. Following this, the potential threats to and vulnerabilities of Chester Farm are highlighted together with some draft outline policies to help inform the way forward
2007
C Hardie
Church Brough is a village of some antiquity built over a Roman Fort which was later followed by a Norman fortress and a planned village with church and green. Archaeo-Environment were commissioned by the developer who wished to convert a build into an ice cream parlour to carry out an archaeological watching brief during the excavation for drainage/services. The watching brief provided little evidence of in-situ archaeological deposits of pre 20th century date. Based on the evidence from the watching brief, the works appear to have had a negligible impact on the archaeological resource of Castle Brough.
2008
Archaeo-Environment were commissioned to undertake a desk based assessment at the Washington Chemical Works, a potential nationally important site, in advance of development. The works are the site of a number of innovative techniques used to advance the chemical industry in the 19th century, and started as a lead, silver and paint manufactory before moving into magnesia and alkali production. It subsequently moved into the production of insulation materials and converted the wire rope works into a cork plant. Although a large area of the development has been reclaimed and offers no constraints a number of zones have been identified where archaeological remains might survive, and where appropriate mitigation has been recommended.
2004
The North Northumberland Coast is a remote and dramatic landscape, and the National Trust have a number of holding throughout the stretch of coastline. Archaeo-Environment Limited conducted historic environment surveys of a number of holdings (Seahouses, Lindisfarne, Newton, Dunstanburgh, Druridge Bay, Beadnall, and Buston Links) which provided information regarding the historic and archaeological significance of the various holdings. All of the work was conducted to National Trust's level three standard, and combined field work with documentary research, resulting in a comprehensive survey of all historic features. They also outlined recommendations for management and future research for both individual features and the landscape, however this document contains the full management recommendations covering all Trust coastal holdings in Northumberland. Obviously the different sites examined have different requirements, however the study found the dynamic nature of the coastline can unexpectedly expose hidden remains from any period in the human past, particularly in inclement weather, and a fast response is required to record such finds. It also recommended that improved interaction between the National Trust Historic Environment Record and the Northumberland County Historic Environment Record might also improve the understanding, monitoring, and identification of sites, and that all National Trust projects based on archaeology should be archived on OASIS.
2009
The intention of this report is to support the Limestone Landscapes Partnership in delivering its key vision
2009
The intention of this report is to support the Limestone Landscapes Partnership in delivering its key vision
2010
Archaeo-Environment Ltd were commissioned by Mr and Mrs Adams of Low Woodside Farm to undertake an archaeological watching brief during the excavation of foundations for a new stable block. The requirement had been identified by Durham County Council as the development sat on the conjectured line of the major Roman Road Dere Street. The development work consisted of a soil strip from an area 22m by 13m for the footprint of the new building, with the foundation trenches exacavated to a maximum depth of 650mm below the present surface. The watching brief provided little evidence of in-situ archaeological deposits, with unstratified pottery dating to the 19th/20th centuries. An area of stone with a single posthole on one side appeared to represent a simple agricultural building surface, and was dated from pottery sherds to the 18th/19th century. Based on the evidence from the watching brief, the construction works appear to have had a negligible impact on any archaeological resources at Low Woodside.
2009
An archaeological watching brief was conducted by Archaeo-Environment Ltd during excavations of a trench for the foundations of a new garage to the rear of Melkridge House, Gilesgate, Durham. Gilegate is of considerable historic significance as a medieval suburb of Durham City, probably originating in 1112 when the Hospital of St Giles was founded. The hospital church of St Giles still survives, and became the parish church for the two row settlement that developed in the area. Although the surroundings have been substantially developed since the mid 19th century, form of Gilegate and associated burgage plots are sill well defined. Melkridge House is a double fronted property built around 1840, and faces onto the north side of Gilegate. It has a rear wing and a number of smaller more recent extensions, while a separate garden occupies the bugage plot. The watching brief provided no evidence of in-situ archaeological deposits of any significance, only revealing various layers of garden soil. It is recommended that further excavation within the immediate area of the garden of Melkridge House would be of limited value due to post medieval disturbance most likely associated with the construction of the house around 1840.
2009
C Hardie
Demolition of existing 1960s detached house and replacement with new country house. Site lies immediately south of Vindobala Roman Fort on Hadrian's Wall. Desk-based assessment and heritage impact assessment by Archaeo-Environment incorporating the results of geophysical survey by Phase SI and evaluation excavation by Pre-Construct Archaeology.
2013
Archaeo-Environment Ltd. were commissioned by Mr Cooke of SC Electrics to undertake an archaeological watching brief during the excavation of ternches to install a new permanent electrical supply for markets traders at the Market Place, Richmond. The Market Place was historically the outer bailey of Richmond Castle (built in 1071) and its large cobbled area is now encircled by a collection of fine mostly Georgian buildings with the 12th century Holy Trinity Church in the centre. The development works consisted of removal of the cobbled Market Place surface and excavation of a small trench running adjacent to the base of the Butler Cross. In summary the watching brief provided no evidence on in-situ archaeological deposits of any significance, only sub base and construction debris associated with the recent re-cobbling.
2009
Archaeo-Environment Ltd. were commissioned to undertaken an update desk based assessment (based on a previous DBA by Tyne and Wear Museums) on land to the north and west of Seahouses. The land was situated behind the Seafield caravan park and is the focus of a proposed development to extend the caravan site. The land is currently used for agriculture, however is on the edge of the medieval village of North Sunderland, while previous discoveries of prehistorc burials within the area now occupied by the Seafield caravan park suggests much earlier occupiation of the landscape. During the 18th and 19th century the area was also used for industrial activities such as coal mining and possible lime burning. The study identified a number of features linked to coal mining within the development area, including a large depression possibly caused by mining which was filled in within recent years. It also highlighted a large subcircular cropmark feature that was situated within the development area and might be related to prehistoric settlement or coal mining activities.
2010
Sheraton is a village of some antiquity now dramatically divided by the A19. In 2008 Northumbria Water Limited (on the advice of Durham County Council Archaeology Section) contracted Archaeo-Environment to monitor the excavation of pits and trenches during renewal of a water pipeline. The watching brief provided little evidence of in-situ archaeological deposits of pre 20th century date, with all other deposits removed when the previous water main had been constructed. A number of sherds of re-deposited medieval pottery were recovered during the fieldwork, while one test pit revealed a replica Samurai sword that had 9with other waste) been used to backfill a hollow in the 1980's. Based on the evidence the works appear to have had a negligible impact on the archaeological resource of Sheraton.
2008
Two trial trenches were excavated to the rear of the Church of St. Mary and St. Romuald. The trenches were excavated to a depth of 1m. This revealed various layers of pre-deposited natural and dumped material dating to the 19th century. They are interpreted as levelling layers associated with the construction of the adjacent church which opened in 1860. There were no earlier finds or features of archaeological interest.
2010
 
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