Inclusive Accessible Archaeology

University of Reading, Bournemouth University, 2006. https://doi.org/10.5284/1000211. How to cite using this DOI

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000211
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University of Reading, Bournemouth University (2006) Inclusive Accessible Archaeology [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000211

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Primary contact

Dr Tim Phillips
Dept of Archaeology
University of Reading
Whiteknights
PO Box 218
Reading
RG6 6AA
England

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000211
Sample Citation for this DOI

University of Reading, Bournemouth University (2006) Inclusive Accessible Archaeology [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000211

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Overview: Project Summary

Project Goals

The aim of the Inclusive, Accessible, Archaeology project was to address the dual issues of disability and transferable skills in the teaching of archaeological fieldwork. Its goals were to:

  • Increase the awareness of disability issues in archaeology.
  • Improve the integration of disability in fieldwork teaching.
  • Improve all students' awareness of their development of transferable skills for the transition to employability through participating in archaeological fieldwork.

Project Outcomes

  • The integration of disabled students into archaeological fieldwork and related activities according to, and consistent with, the mandatory legal requirements of disability legislation.
  • A change of emphasis from 'disability' to 'ability': rather than excluding or categorising individuals, all students will be engaged in evaluating their own skills. A self-evaluation toolkit will be developed to encourage students to reflect on their own ability.
  • By embedding the toolkit into archaeological fieldwork training and professional skills teaching, students will be engaged actively in evaluating both the archaeological and transferable skills that they are developing.
  • Dissemination of the results through published guidelines, websites, workshops and conference presentations carried out in association with the project's professional stakeholders (the Institute of Field Archaeologists, the Council for British Archaeology, English Heritage, and Oxford Archaeology) and with the assistance of the Higher Education Academy Subject Centre.

Project Design

  • Phase 1 - Assessment:
    Evaluate through questionnaires the issues surrounding, and current practices relating to, disability and archaeological fieldwork training in Universities and in the professional sector. Investigate the individual experiences of disabled students and professional archaeologists through Case Studies based on interviews.
  • Phase 2 - Characterisation:
    Develop a generic method of assessing physical and cognitive abilities of disabled/non-disabled people to participate in archaeological fieldwork training and produce the pro forma of the self-evaluation toolkit.
  • Phase 3 - Controlled testing:
    Test and refine the characterisation of archaeological field activities and environments through controlled tests with volunteers.
  • Phase 4 - Field trials:
    Assess the suitability of controlled tests and generic method of evaluation through field trials on archaeological excavations.
  • Phase 5 - Evaluation and Dissemination:
    Refine and disseminate the project results and deliverables. Dissemination included the publication of articles in professional, academic and popular archaeology and access journals, the compilation of guidelines for good practice, conference presentations, and the availability of reports and case studies on the project website.


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