Taylor, G. M., Widdison, S., Brown, I., Young, D. and Molleson, T. I. (2000). A mediaeval case of lepromatous leprosy from 13th-14th century Orkney, Scotland. J Archaeol Sci 27 (12). Vol 27(12), pp. 1133-1138.

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
A mediaeval case of lepromatous leprosy from 13th-14th century Orkney, Scotland
Issue
Issue
The name of the volume or issue
Issue:
J Archaeol Sci 27 (12)
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Journal of Archaeological Science
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
27 (12)
Page Start/End
Page Start/End
The start and end page numbers.
Page Start/End:
1133 - 1138
Biblio Note
Biblio Note
This is a Bibliographic record only.
Biblio Note
Please note that this is a bibliographic record only, as originally entered into the BIAB database. The ADS have no files for download, and unfortunately cannot advise further on where to access hard copy or digital versions.
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Abstract
Abstract
The abstract describing the content of the publication or report
Abstract:
Erosion in the 1960s resulted in exposure of human skeletal remains from a Norse Christian cemetery at Newark Bay. One set of remains showed osteological evidence of advanced lepromatous leprosy, but the absence of bones from the lower limbs precluded definitive diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether Mycobacterium leprae could be detected in bone extracts, as a means of confirming the diagnosis of leprosy. Bone samples were examined from the suspected leprosy case and from a second contemporary burial thought to be free of disease. DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for a repetitive element (RLEP) characteristic of M. leprae. Additional PCR tests specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for amelogenin (a human gene suitable for sex determination) were also applied to the samples. M. leprae DNA was detected only in the skull sample from the suspected leprosy case. The DNA sequence was identical to that found in present day isolates of M. leprae. Positive results were only obtained using a PCR reaction designed to amplify relatively short stretches of DNA, suggesting the microbial DNA had undergone extensive fragmentation. There was no evidence of M. tuberculosis DNA in bones from the leprosy suspect or control individual. The ability to recover ancient samples of DNA provides an opportunity to study long-term evolutionary changes that may affect the epidemiology of microbial pathogens.
Author
Author
The authors of this publication or report
Author:
G M Taylor
Stephanie Widdison
Ivor N Brown
Douglas Young
Theya I Molleson
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2000
Locations
Locations
Any locations covered by the publication or report. This is not the place the book or report was published.
Subjects / Periods:
Burial (Auto Detected Subject))
13th14th Century (Auto Detected Temporal)
Bone (Auto Detected Subject))
Human Skeletal Remains (Auto Detected Subject))
Skull (Auto Detected Subject))
Cemetery (Auto Detected Subject))
Bone (Auto Detected Subject))
Leprosy (BIAB)
Bones (Human) (BIAB)
Medieval (BIAB)
Disease [Swp] Anthrax (BIAB)
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
BIAB (The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB))
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
07 Feb 2001