Hepple, L. W. (2004). Reconstructing a medieval charter boundary: Sturton Grange, Northumberland. Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5. Vol 33, pp. 89-115. https://doi.org/10.5284/1061128. Cite this via datacite

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Reconstructing a medieval charter boundary: Sturton Grange, Northumberland
Issue
Issue
The name of the volume or issue
Issue:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
33
Page Start/End
Page Start/End
The start and end page numbers.
Page Start/End:
89 - 115
Downloads
Downloads
Any files associated with the publication or report that can be downloaded from the ADS
Downloads:
archael533-089-115-hepple.pdf (55 MB) : Download
Licence Type
Licence Type
ADS, CC-BY 4.0 or CC-BY 4.0 NC.
Licence Type:
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License icon
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License
DOI
DOI
The DOI (digital object identifier) for the publication or report.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.5284/1061128
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Abstract
Abstract
The abstract describing the content of the publication or report
Abstract:
The Cartulary of the Cistercian monastery of Newminster contains a detailed boundary charter for the Northumberland township of Sturton Grange, near Warkworth. This is one of very few medieval boundary charters for a complete township in Northumberland. The paper sets the charter in its historical context, and then attempts a detailed reconstruction of the boundary perambulation. It is shown that much of the boundary can still be located, and some sections seen in the landscape. A field name surviving virtually unchanged since the twelfth century is identified, as is a tongue of land called a `lynga' in the charter, together with the rediscovery of a spring named in a thirteenth-century charter. The changing medieval landscape, with pressures on the remaining woodland and open pasture, can also be traced through subsequent medieval charters and agreements.
Author
Author
The authors of this publication or report
Author:
Leslie W Hepple
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2004
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Relations
Relations
Other resources which are relevant to this publication or report
Relations:
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019