Deegan, A. (2001). Air Photo Mapping and Interpretation of Land at Armthorpe, South Yorkshire. Leeds: Alison Deegan Air Photo Interpretation and Mapping.

Title
Title
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Title:
Air Photo Mapping and Interpretation of Land at Armthorpe, South Yorkshire
Number of Pages
Number of Pages
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Number of Pages:
21
Biblio Note
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Biblio Note
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Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Report
Abstract
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Abstract:
Air photo mapping and interpretation was undertaken of an area of 9 sq. km. In the site there was a general absence of identifiable Neolithic and Bronze Age remains, and similarly a dearth of evidence for cropmark or earthwork features of post-Roman date. As at Misterton Carr any remains of early activity could have survived beneath the fen peat of West Moor. Although generally regular and homogenous some details of the layout of the fields, lanes and enclosures suggested that the land was enclosed in a piecemeal fashion. The crop marks revealed a predominantly agricultural landscape of fields, trackways and enclosures. It was likely that most features dated to the Late Iron Age or Roman period. The length of trackways at Gunhills (AP4) together with those near Junction 4 of the M18 (AP6) and at Long Sandall Common (AP18) appeared to circumscribe the area of peaty soils and fen peat at West Moor. The evidence from Misterton Carr, Nottinghamshire and elsewhere on the Hatfield Chase and Thornes Waste suggested that the fen peat developed in the Late Neolithic and Bronze Ages and hence probably predated these fields and lanes. Prior to the 17th century drainage, West Moor would probably have been unworkable so although the soils there were not conducive to crop mark formation it was unlikely that the field systems continued unseen into this area. The trackway may have served the limits of the agriculturally viable land. The layout of the field systems at Tranmoor (AP1), Edenthorpe (AP 14) and Long Sandall Common (AP 20) was commonly referred to as 'brickwork plan' and had been observed widely on the Sherwood Sandstones in South Yorkshire and North Nottinghamshire. The 'brickwork plan' field systems were characterised by long parallel ditches and short cross-boundaries delimiting narrow fields with small internal rectilinear enclosures, singly or in clusters. The ditches near Cozen Croft (AP 19) suggested a more irregular layout of shorter and broader fields. The interface between these fields and the more regular layout to the north (AP 20) was marked by an abrupt narrowing of the trackway (AP18) which ran through both. The long, narrow fields at Edenthorpe (AP14) were arranged along a broad funnelled avenue. However, the more northerly rows of field extended further west than those to the south resulting in a narrower passage, possibly indicating that they were bought into use at different times. A possible short length of lane was identified in between built up areas near Whiphill Lane (AP21), this may have indicated that the intensive field systems seen at Tranmoor continued into the slower draining soils of land at Whiphills. A single enclosure with an internal hut circle abutted a ditch of the field system at Tranmoor (AP1). There were other enclosures in the vicinity, two rectangular examples (AP2 and 3) and two curvilinear (beyond the limits of this survey area) but it was not clear if they were associated with the fields. An enclosure at Edenthorpe (AP13) was cut or was cut by part of the regular field system (AP14), it was possible that the enclosure predated the layout of the fields. Similarly the relationship between the possible enclosure near Cozen Corner (AP17) and the surrounding fields (AP16) was unlikely to be one of contemporary construction. [Au(adp)]
Author
Author
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Author:
Alison Deegan
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Alison Deegan Air Photo Interpretation and Mapping
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2001
Locations
Locations
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Locations:
Location - Auto Detected: Hatfield Chase
Location - Auto Detected: Misterton Carr Nottinghamshire
Location - Auto Detected: West Moor
Location - Auto Detected: Edenthorpe
Location - Auto Detected: Misterton Carr
Location - Auto Detected: South Yorkshire
Location - Auto Detected: Sherwood Sandstones
Location - Auto Detected: Whiphill Lane
Location - Auto Detected: North Nottinghamshire
Subjects / Periods
Subjects / Periods
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Subjects / Periods:
Bronze Age (MIDAS)
17th Century (Auto Detected Temporal)
Roman (MIDAS)
Bronze Age (MIDAS)
Late Iron Age (MIDAS)
Neolithic (MIDAS)
Late Neolithic (MIDAS)
Note
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Note:
Date Of Issue From: 2001 Date Of Coverage From: 01 Date Of Coverage To: 01 Editorial Expansion: Site name: LAND AT ARMTHORPE
Study area:
Investigation type: Desk-based
District: Doncaster
Monument: FIELD SYSTEM. Undated, DITCH. Undated, HUT CIRCLE. Undated, TRACKWAY. Undated, ENCLOSURE. Undated
Ngr: SE62500350, SE65500650
Parish: Armthorpe, Hatfield
Postcode: DN3 3UE, DN7 6BA
Source
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Source:
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BIAB (Archaeological Investigations Project (AIP))
Created Date
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Created Date:
19 Jan 2009