Yorkshire Archaeological Journal 81

Title
Title
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Title:
Yorkshire Archaeological Journal 81
Series
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Series:
Yorkshire Archaeological Journal
Volume
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Volume:
81
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Publication Type:
Journal
Editor
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Editor:
Edward Royle
Jill Wilson
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Publisher:
Yorkshire Archaeological Society
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Year of Publication:
2009
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BIAB (biab_online)
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URI: http://www.yas.org.uk/content/YAJcontents/Cont081.html
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Created Date:
17 Feb 2014

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Abstract
Reference record only 1 - 45
Stuart W. Feather (1927-2002), founder and former curator of Bradford Industrial Museum, was in his private time an avid collector of prehistoric material for almost half a century, during which he amassed an impressive lithic collection off the local moorlands surrounding his home town of Keighley in West Yorkshire. Through the kindness of his widow, what remains of this collection was recently passed to the author and others for analysis. The vast majority of this lithic material is later Mesolithic, including characteristic 'narrow blade' tools, and following on from the work of previous authors and collectors, such as Crowther, Turner and Gilks, adds considerably to our knowledge of Mesolithic activity in this part of the Pennines.
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Reference record only Ian Roberts
47 - 137
A 1.4-ha excavation, carried out in advance of housing development, investigated the site of a multi-phase settlement dating approximately to between the mid-1st and mid=3rd centuries AD. The earliest later Iron Age activity was represented by a diverse range of apparently unenclosed structures and features, which were replaced by a rectilinear enclosure complex focused upon a principal enclosure containing a central roundhouse. The enclosure complex was subsequently re-organised and expanded, a development which might be equated with a trend from pastoralism towards arable farming. Despite an increase in the adoption of Roman material culture (in the form of pottery), the site seems to have remained essentially native. As well as a notable assemblage of pottery the site has produced significant quantities of animal bone, small assemblages of stone artefacts, ironwork and metalworking residues, six infant burials and a single Roman coin. Earlier prehistoric activity is represented by an assemblage of residual worked flint flakes and tools.
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Reference record only Gavin Robinson
139 - 177
A previously unknown Romano-British settlement was discovered during the summer of 2002 close to Millfield Farm, Wheldrake, to the south-east of York (SE 668 443) during construction of the Yorkshire Derwent Aqueduct water pipeline between Elvington and Riccall.
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Reference record only Hyland Lee
179 - 197
This article discusses the recorded archaeological evidence for activity in Holderness during the Roman period. The research demonstrates that the region is far from being an archaeological void, instead a range of Roman period artefacts have been found distributed widely across the Holderness plain. Coin and pottery evidence shows that activity took place throughout the Roman period. A number of occupation sites have been identified and it is suggested that subsistence was agricultural in nature. An examination of aerial photographic evidence revealed over 100 records to sites of potential prehistoric or Roman activity. There appears to be a correlation between the location of the evidence and areas of alluvium and water courses. This may indicate that water transport, and access to the River Humber, was important. Though the nature of the activity is poorly understood and the evidences asks more questions than it answers, there is archaeology yet to be discovered and the area is deserving of a more detailed investigation.
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Reference record only H Taylor
311 - 327
The remains of nine limekilns survive at Barnby Basin, the former terminus of the Barnsley canal, near the village of Cawthorne. This article uses business records and other contemporary evidence to look at trade on the canal and the distribution of lime products for building and agricultural purposes along the turnpikes of the hinterland of Barnby to the south, east and north, especially to the Holmfirth area. The canal was completed to Barnby in 1802 and the kilns continued in use until the early 1870s, by which time the transportation in the area had been revolutionised by the development of railways.
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Reference record only Linzi Harvey
329 - 335
Two wooden soled shoes with decorated clasps were recovered during historic building recording of the former Woodlands Mill in Steeton, West Yorkshire by Archaeological Consultancy and Research at the University of Sheffield (ARCUS). They were found in a small recess in a wall, 3-4 m above ground level, within a wheel pit. With the wheel in place, it would have been impossible to access this alcove, indicating that these items are 'concealed shoes' (Swann 1996). The deliberate secretion of old shoes within buildings is not unusual. It is a long-established superstition, common in the 17th century and continuing into the 20th, with a possible 14th century origin.\r\nShoes have been found concealed in buildings ranging from monasteries and stately homes to public houses and cottages, but according to Swann's 1996 study of over 1550 concealed shoes, only 10 have come from factories or workhouses. Although recent archaeological survey at a cotton spinning mill in Manchester revealed two concealed shores within the building complex, these finds are not commonly recovered in industrial settings.\r\nSwann, J. 1996. 'Shoes concealed in buildings', Costume, 30, 56-69.
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Reference record only Carolyn Chenery
Jane Evans
347 - 350
The recent paper by Hall et al. 2008 is a welcome publication that includes isotope data on tooth enamel from a number of individuals. While the interpretation within the paper is not incorrect, in the time between the production of the data and the publication, some of the samples were re-analysed for oxygen isotope composition, by a more consistent and reliable method, and more strontium isotope data is available for comparative studies. Hence we submit this note to update the dataset and context for the Riccall individuals described in Hall et al. 2008.\r\nHall et al. 2008. 'The medieval cemetery at Riccall Landing: a reappraisal', YAJ 80:55-92
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Reference record only Rita Wood
355 - 356
The stone in question has recently been discussed in this journal as an early carved head of pre-Conquest date, and as perhaps representing the face of Odin (YAJ 2008, 80:43-50..\r\nThis article expands on that earlier description. \r\nThe Kildwick corbel was probably discovered and reset during the restoration in 1901-03, when numerous pre-Conquest stones were found in the south wall of the chancel.
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Reference record only Tony Wilmott
Stephen J Sherlock
Grenville G Astill
Jonathan Finch
357 - 374
Reviews of: \r\nExcavations at Bowes and Lease Rigg Roman Forts, by S.S. Frere and R.L. Fitts, Yorkshire Archaeological Report 6, 2009, Yorkshire Archaeological Society.\r\n\r\nYorkshire Gazetteer of Anglo-Saxon and Viking Sites, by Guy Points, 2007, Rihtspell.\r\n\r\nThe North Manor and North-West Enclosure. Wharram: A Study of Settlement on the Yorkshire Wolds, IX, by P. A. Rhatz and L. Watts, York University Archaeological Publications 11, 2004, English Heritage and York University Archaeological Publications.\r\n\r\nWater Resources and their Management. Wharram: A Study of Settlement on the Yorkshire Wolds, X, by C. Treen and M. Atkin, York University Archaeological Publications 12, 2005, English Heritage and York University Archaeological Publications.\r\n\r\nShiptonthorpe, East Yorkshire: Archaeological Studies of a Romano-Brititsh Roadside Settlement, ed. by M. Millett, Yorkshire Archaeological Report 5, 2006, Yorkshire Archaeological Society.\r\n\r\nThe Medieval Park: New Perspectives, ed. by Robert Liddiard, 2007, Windgather Press.\r\nWho Built Beverley Minster? ed. by P. S. Barnwell and Arnold Pacey, 2008, Spire Books.\r\n\r\nArchaeology of the A1(M) Darrington to Dishforth DBFO Road Scheme, F. Brown et al., Lancaster Imprints, 2007, Oxford Archaeology North.\r\n\r\nEight Centuries of Milling in North East Yorkshire, by John K. Harrison, 2001, new edition 2008, North York Moors National Park Authority.\r\n\r\n
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