Durham Archaeological Journal (19)

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Durham Archaeological Journal (19)
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Durham Archaeological Journal
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
19
Number of Pages
Number of Pages
The number of pages in the publication or report
Number of Pages:
231
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Editor
Editor
The editor of the publication or report
Editor:
David Mason
Sarah Semple
David Petts
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2014
Source
Source
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Source:
Source icon
BIAB (biab_online)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
09 Apr 2015

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Reference record only Peter Rowe
1 - 5
The base and lower portion of a Bronze Age combed-zone Beaker were discovered during the excavation of a foundation for a wall at a farm near Maltby, Stockton-on-Tees. Small-scale archaeological investigation revealed some additional sherds but no cut features or other evidence. The artefact is described and parallels from the wider vicinity are discussed. Along with the growing evidence for settlement in the area in the later prehistoric period, some recent discoveries of Beakers in the lower Tees Valley suggest a focus of activity which would not have been suspected twenty years ago. LD
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Reference record only Blaise E Vyner
2 - 3
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Reference record only Iain M Ferris
7 - 21
The Roman carved jet dog which forms the subject of this paper was recovered during excavations in 1971 within Binchester Roman fort (Vinovium), to the north of the praetorium. The item is described in detail and then discussed in terms of parallels from elsewhere in Roman Britain and beyond. The presence of actual dogs at Binchester fort in the Roman period is then briefly discussed in the context of the various roles possibly played by dogs at this time, as suggested by the archaeological record. The possible symbolic meaning of the image of the dog in Romano-British art and life is then considered.
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Reference record only Vaughan Birbeck
23 - 31
A three-day archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Channel 4's Time Team on the site of Binchester Roman fort, County Durham, in 2007. Geophysical survey provided information on the layout of the vicus. Earlier fort ditches were also mapped, along with the course of Dere Street to the west of the fort, a further road heading north-east from the fort, and a series of mausolea. Three trenches were excavated: one within the Scheduled Monument to examine the vicus and antiquarian excavations; one to examine large rectilinear features identified by geophysical survey and aerial photography, thought to represent the defences of an early timber fort; and one to examine the mausolea. The evaluation has shown that substantial and important stratified remains survive below ground, demonstrating their extent, character and condition.
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Reference record only W C Fawcett
33 - 42
Reviews the evidence for Cade's Road, an undefined Roman route representing a north-south link east of Dere Street between York and the Tyne, following the excavation by Channel 4's Time Team in 2002 of a previously unknown 2nd century settlement in Hardwick East Park in Sedgefield. 18th, 19th and 20th century writings and a topographical study of 1963 are discussed, and it is concluded that at the beginning of 2002, evidence favoured the existence of a Cade's Road but its course was unproven. The discovery of the settlement at Hardwick may strengthen the argument in favour of a route via Sedgefield, but could be more suggestive of indigenous British activity than Roman military or economic development. The route of Cade's Road still cannot be regarded as certain anywhere through County Durham, and its existence as a Roman road may be questionable. LD
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Reference record only A Platell
43 - 103
This paper presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted in advance of redevelopment at two locations on the west side of Newcastle Road, Chester-le-Street, both of which revealed a partial section across the Roman road heading north from the town. At the former Highfield Hospital in 2004 the Roman road overlay a ditch and cut a cobble spread interpreted as the remains of a cairn; these and other features in the area were interpreted as Bronze Age. At 15 Newcastle Road in 2006, a coin and pottery dated construction of the road to the Hadrianic era. Evidence for a series of roadside enclosures to the east was also recorded.
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Reference record only Blaise E Vyner
62
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Reference record only Scott Martin
63
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Reference record only Chris G Cumberpatch
63
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Reference record only Jason Mole
63 - 65
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Reference record only Blaise E Vyner
65 - 66
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Reference record only Fraser Hunter
66
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Reference record only Charlotte E O'Brien
67
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Reference record only John N Dore
Steven Willis
80 - 82
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Reference record only Jennifer Jones
82
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Reference record only Jennifer Jones
82
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Reference record only Richard J Brickstock
83
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Reference record only Dawn McLaren
83
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Reference record only Louisa J Gidney
83 - 84
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Reference record only Charlotte E O'Brien
84
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Reference record only 93 - 94
Catalogues for prehistoric pottery and cup-marked stones. LD
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Reference record only 95 - 103
Table 1: Post-medieval pottery data. Table 2: Summary of lithic material by colour. Table 3: Summary of flint type. Table 4: Analysis of flakes and flake tools. Table 5: Environmental sample dataflak. LD
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Reference record only Jacqueline I McKinley
105 - 106
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Channel 4's Time Team at The Castles, a Scheduled Monument at West Shipley Farm, Hamsterley, believed to be the remains of a fortified site of Late Iron Age, Romano-British or post-Roman date. The investigation included evaluation trenching and geophysical and standing remains surveys, the results of which are briefly summarised in this article. Although clearly constructed by a substantial workforce as a defensive fortification, there is little evidence to indicate what the site was used for or its date. LD
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Reference record only Peter F Ryder
Richard J Carlton
107 - 132
A programme of archaeological fieldwork was undertaken at the church of St Michael and All Angels, Houghton-le-Spring, in advance of the installation of an underfloor heating system, which principally involved the excavation of the floors in the nave, crossing and north transept. In addition, parts of the nave wall were recorded when the plaster was stripped to reveal cracked masonry, and a basement space beneath the organ was examined. This article includes a summary of the context of the site before describing the results of the fieldwork and discussing the structural phasing of the church. The findings suggest that the history of the church may be considerably older and more complex than hitherto believed, since it now appears likely that Roman building stones were used in the construction of the medieval church, and features of pre-Norman and Norman provenance were also evidenced.
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Reference record only Anthony F Harding
163 - 175
Discusses a copy of Ten Years Diggings by Thomas Bateman, a book on prehistoric barrow excavations published in 1861. The book was owned by Canon Greenwell, whose signature appears on the fly-leaf. In addition it bears two book-plates of L H D Atkinson and was also used by another antiquarian, perhaps one Charles Monkman. The copy bears notes and marginal remarks in pencil in a number of places, a few of which are of interest because they give an idea of Greenwell's relations with fellow antiquaries. While the marginalia do not add greatly to the sum of knowledge, they do show that Greenwell was a shrewd observer of his fellow excavators, and clearly thought Bateman gullible. The archaeological collections in Durham are almost devoid of 'Greenwelliana', so this is an especially valuable memento. LD
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Reference record only David J Graham
Chris G Cumberpatch
177 - 215
This report presents the results of an investigation conducted in 2004 by Archaeological Services Durham University in advance of development at the site of the late 19th century Linthorpe Art Pottery, Middlesbrough. The Linthorpe Pottery was made world famous by the contribution of the designer Dr Christopher Dresser. It was innovative in its application of new technology to pottery manufacture, most notably with glazes, and was the first pottery in the country to use the recently developed gas-fired kilns. The pottery was established in 1879 on the former site of a brick works. Its subsequent history is outlined in this report before the results of the investigation are described; the excavation revealed remains relating to the earlier brick works as well as the pottery itself. Artefacts recovered during the work are then discussed. These included items such as tiles and kiln furniture as well as pottery from Linthorpe and from elsewhere. LD
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