n.a. (1976). Settlement and economy in the third and second millennia BC: papers delivered at a conference organized by the Department of Adult Education, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, January 1976.

Title
Title
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Title:
Settlement and economy in the third and second millennia BC: papers delivered at a conference organized by the Department of Adult Education, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, January 1976
Series
Series
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Series:
British Archaeological Reports
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
33
Biblio Note
Biblio Note
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Biblio Note
Please note that this is a bibliographic record only, as originally entered into the BIAB database. The ADS have no files for download, and unfortunately cannot advise further on where to access hard copy or digital versions.
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
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Abstract:
The conference aimed to bridge the increasingly artificial division between Late Neolithic and EBA, with papers reporting new excavations which demonstrate the continuum of 3rd-2nd millennium activity, and others suggesting new orientations of thought. C Burgess (pp i-iii) defines three clearly recognizable phases: 1, mid-3rd to early-2nd millennium - Late Neo wares and early Beakers, copper developments and the start of bronze working; II, early-2nd millennium - shift to more cremation with consequent development of cinerary urns and accessory vessels, late Beakers, and fully developed bronze technology; III (14C dates c 1500-1250 bc) cremation dominant, Beakers and Food Vessels finished and Deverel-Rimbury adding to the profusion of cinerary urns. P Catherall (pp 1-9) considers some detailed information from henge sites and removes some misconceptions. Francis Pryor (29-49) discusses the fen-edge community at Fengate, which changed from a pastoral Late Neo/BA economy to a settled mixed farming one in EIA. J V S Megaw (51-79) publishes and discusses some plans and finds from the Neo-BA settlement at Gwithian, with appendices on the Urnfield pins (M J Rowlands) and the axe-mould of Penard Phase (C Burgess). An interim statement on recent work at the Grimes Graves flint mines comes from R J Mercer (101-11) Abundant Neo evidence, including nine possible henges, is turning up in the Milfield Basin (NE Northumberland) as presented by R Miket (113-42), while C Burgess (151-79) reports work on the Neo promontory settlement defended by a massive timber barrier (shown in cropmark as a pit alignment) at Meldon Bridge near Peebles, and also (181-207) on an essentially pastoral settlement of late-3rd/early-2nd millennium BC on the machair at Kilellan Farm, Islay. D V Clarke (233-50), reporting on Skara Brae excavations, shows how unduly restrictive interpretations of the Orkney evidence have needlessly isolated this area from the mainland Late Neo; functional interpretations should be more helpful. George Eogan (251-66) presents Beaker sherds and a burial from Knowth. C S Briggs (267-82) suggests that 'trade' was far less important in Neo-BA times than is customarily supposed, relatively local scatters of jet, amber, stone for axes and copper ores being sufficient for local needs. J Barrett and others (283-7) have traced 650m of prehistoric field banks by probing in peat at Achnacree; these represent recolonization of heathland which may itself have accelerated podsolization and peat growth. J Barrett's model (289-307) for the Deverel-Rimbury complex suggests a derivation from Late Neo Grooved Ware traditions and development into a significant element of EBA settlement and burial, terminating in 11th century although some aspects of it are continued in later ceramics. Colin Burgess, with assistance from S J Shennan (309-31) introduces a radical reassessment of the Beaker phenomenon, rejecting the notion of a separate migrant ethnic group and seeing instead the spreading by traders and prospectors of a 'Beaker package' of cult and ceremonial with heroic or prestige overtones, which could be and was readily absorbed into local cultures nearly everywhere. Many puzzling features of Beaker associations are found to fall into place, though some difficulties remain. Shorter reports come from: H S Green (Stacey Bushes settlement, 11-27); P Catherall (Litton Cheney cairn, 81-100); David Coombs (Callis Wold Barrow 275 Beakers, 143-50); I A G Shepherd (Rosinish Beaker settlement, 209-19); and D D A Simpson (Northton settlement, 221-31). See also 77/4309.
Issue Editor
Issue Editor
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Issue Editor:
Colin B Burgess
Roger F Miket
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
1976
Locations
Locations
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Locations:
Location - Auto Detected: Peebles
Location - Auto Detected: Orkney
Location - Auto Detected: Gwithian
Location - Auto Detected: Meldon Bridge
Location - Auto Detected: Fengate
Location - Auto Detected: Kilellan Farm
Location - Auto Detected: Milfield Basin NE Northumberland
Subjects / Periods
Subjects / Periods
Subjects / Periods associated with this record.
Subjects / Periods:
Late Neo (Auto Detected Temporal)
Prehistoric (MIDAS)
11th Century (Auto Detected Temporal)
Late Neolithic (MIDAS)
Note
Note
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Note:
Date Of Issue From: 1976
Source
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Source:
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BIAB (British Archaeological Abstracts (BAA))
Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
05 Dec 2008