Series: British Archaeological Reports

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Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Francesco Menotti
No Abstract icon
2001
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Evan M Chapman (Ed.)
Catalogue of the Roman military equipment held in the National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, including an historical survey of the relevant collections of the Museum; a brief account of the Roman army in Wales; and an explanation of the structure of the catalogue. The catalogue is followed by a gazetteer which gives an outline description of the sites from which the material comes and a listing of the objects by site, with cross-reference to the catalogue proper. There is also a discussion which gives a brief overview of the collection as a whole.
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2005
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Ron Hardaker
Corpus, discussion, typology and cultural background are provided for a total of 34 pommels, mostly of bone but including those surviving only as gold mounts. Six types are isolated on the basis of shape, size and method of attachment. Associations are tabulated and discussed. The eight pommels of Group II had no metal blades and may have been specially mounted as funerary models where metal was too precious to bury. The Shrewton pommel may provide the starting date, c 2000 BC, for the whole series.
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1974
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Miranda J Aldhouse-Green
No Abstract icon
1976
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Martin Henig
No Abstract icon
1974
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Martin Henig
Catalogue raisonné with discussion intended to show that Roman gems from archaeological sites can illuminate the attitudes of the residents, especially where inscriptions are absent. They depict not only religious subjects (classical, Celtic and oriental) but events of daily life. Final chapters treat comparative material and the re-use of Roman gems in the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods. See also Curr Archaeol, 4, 1974, 314-7 for more general account.
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1974
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Miranda J Aldhouse-Green
Treats the sites which were excluded from author's work on civilian Britain and includes small personal cult objects rather than temples and their associated objects. There are sections on Roman and Celtic deities, pagan Oriental cults and Christianity, ritual objects frequency and distribution.
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1978
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Miranda J Aldhouse-Green
No Abstract icon
1978
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Olaf O Swarbrick
No Abstract icon
2012
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Mark Hinman (Ed.)
Excavations during 1999 revealed the remains of a small farmstead first investigated in 1989. The site was established some time prior to 20 AD, during the Late Iron Age, and consisted of a single dwelling and associated structures set within a pair of sub-rectangular ditched enclosures. For a brief period following the Roman invasion pottery was produced on the site. The excavation revealed a kiln which produced a complete and well preserved set of `furniture' from the kiln's internal structure and a number of near-complete pottery vessels. Abandonment during the latter half of the first century AD was marked by the deliberate burial of a range of selected objects. The burial of the kiln furniture also appears to have been a contemporary act and possibly a symbolic statement. The single cremation recovered is probably datable to this period. Towards the end of the first century AD the site was re-organised, possibly to permit animal husbandry. At least two aisled barns were incorporated into newly laid out field systems, as were two water cisterns. Further re-ordering of the field systems in the mid-third to mid-fourth centuries AD was associated with the re-establishment of human occupation including the construction of a house, an adjacent malting oven constructed over a small votive pit, and pits containing burnt crop processing waste. The site was probably abandoned between 360 and 370 AD. Specialist reports include
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2003
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon John V Dumont
Surveys types of wear traces, their causes, and their role in functional interpretation; discusses equipment, methodology, and the interferometry technique used; tabulates the microwear analyses of flints from the two sites; and discusses the results in comparison with those of other researchers. It is concluded that some intrasite correlations can he made between tool attributes and functions (eg at Mount Sandel the flake axes had all worked wood). Not only retouched edges are used, and many unretouched items show signs of use: what is a 'tool'? Intersite comparisons indicate broad types of activity. Sample size needs careful thought.
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1988
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Thomas Finan
The study investigates the nation and nationalism, national ideology, and national identity in Ireland during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, and aims to explore whether such terms as ``nation'' or ``nationalism'' may be applied to medieval Ireland. While some historians and sociologists argue that the nation may exist only in the modern world with the advent of the nation-state, others have shown that, at least, ethnic groups which appear to be nations existed in medieval Europe, possibly in antiquity. In Ireland, historiographical issues related to the creation of the modern Irish state in the early twentieth century have always guided the study of the nation and nationalism. The study focuses on the manifestations of the medieval nation in Ireland as found in the historical and archaeological record, and the central questions addressed include whether there are observable manifestations of a nation, national identity, and ethnically-based ideology in Gaelic Ireland in the years 1200--1400, and the extent to which those manifestations may accurately be described in national terms. In this study, the nation is defined as a population sharing an ethnic history, tradition, language, and/or religion, and this population's connection with a particular, definable geographic region. In addition, the author argues that this identity is shown as often conflicting with the self-ascribed identity of another population sharing the same or neighbouring geographic space. Hence, examples of a nation found in medieval Ireland may embody the double characteristics of being a means of self-identity for the Irish and of self-distinction from the Anglo-Normans.
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2004
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Brian M Smith (Ed.)
On the Humberhead Levels between the Rivers Ouse and Trent, the former raised mires of Hatfield Moors and Thorne Moors have been studies using pollen analytical, stratigraphic and radiocarbon dating techniques. Pollen analysis of nine sites from both mires has revealed a series of changes in vegetation which can be attributed to the activities of people. A series of phases of agricultural activity have been delimited from the Bronze Age through to the Middle Ages. These periods of agricultural activity are separated by phases of forest or woodland regeneration. Five regional pollen assemblage zones have been proposed encompassing a period of time from c.4500 BP to c.500 BP. Microstratigraphic study of the ombrotrophic peat from both mires has revealed a number of recurrence surfaces, of which the unhumified peat component corresponds to phase shifts to wetter mire conditions. These recurrence surfaces have been placed into five major groups which appear to reflect, in the main, deteriorations in the prevailing climate, although sea-level changes and autogenic vegetational processes are also of importance. Macrostratigraphic investigation of both mires has enabled the peat deposits to be categorised into three distinct stages of mire development: rheotrophic, mesotrophic and ombrotrophic mire. Thorne Moors shows all three stages, although there are temporal variations in the initiation and persistence of these stages in different areas of the mire. On Hatfield Moors, only a very limited development of the first two stages was encountered, and ombrotrophic peats are dominant. The differences in ontogenesis may be due to hydroedaphic variations in the vicinity of each mire. Includes
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2002
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Gary Coates (Ed.)
The book describes the results of the excavation of seven areas at Whitemoor Haye Quarry, in the River Tame valley. The periods most strongly represented are the Iron Age and Romano-British, although finds from other periods have also been recorded. Includes appendices on radiocarbon dates; petrographic descriptions; Roman pottery fabric descriptions; and a list of Roman vessel classes represented.
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2002
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Sue Harrington (Ed.)
In this volume, the author examines the woodland banking in the parish of Cudham on the North Downs to establish the phases of expansion and contraction of the woodlands in the medieval period. An anomaly was evident between the Domesday Book reference suggesting extensive ploughlands and a post-medieval reference suggesting extensive woodlands. Synthesis of the evidence from a sampling survey of the banking, the place-name evidence and from documentary sources suggested changes in the land use and settlement patterns, with the woodlands consistently prominent through all periods. The extant banking is thought to relate to the earliest medieval settlement of the parish, which probably took the form of bounded estates. Their later use as woodland banks has preserved them in the landscape. Early medieval use of the landscape for transhumant pasturing, followed by a dispersed settlement in the woodlands, led to a limited, arable, open field system in the later medieval period. Non-manorial land tenure was characterised by renting, indicating the ability to generate income through the sale of surplus woodland products. The post-medieval period is characterised by privately-owned woodland compartments. The conclusion is drawn that, over time, Cudham has been maintained as a specialised, woodland resource-producing area in the hinterland of London. Appendices include a tree-recording sheet; medieval field names; and a glossary of place-name elements.
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2004
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon H W Lee (Ed.)
Study covering the significance of the Lower Palaeolithic lithic tool traditions usually referred to as Early, Middle and Late Acheulian and Clactonian. The work (concentrating on selected sites from the Upper and Middle Thames Valley) includes sections devoted to the interpretation of significant patterns of artefact manufacture and use, and the question of the procurement and economic use of lithic raw material. Special emphasis is given to lithic styles and technology, recurrent morphological patterns within stone tool assemblages, and the effect of the varying distances between occupation sites and the lithic raw material sources. Particular reference is made to previously uncatalogued material collected between 1975 and 2000, and a detailed comparative study is made, using a variety of methods, of material from five sites: Highlands Farm, Berinsfield, Iffley, Wolvercote and Stanton Harcourt. Includes
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2001
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Victoria S Winton (Ed.)
The book presents the results of an investigation of Lower and Middle Palaeolithic stone artefacts from southern England, with particular reference to assemblages from two sites at high levels in the landscape. The author aims to show that aspects of cultural adaptation in European archaic humans can be investigated using the evidence of these artefacts. She also examines the question of how best to understand Palaeolithic artefacts preserved within deposits mapped as clay-with-flints. She reviews approaches to the study of stone artefacts produced as a result of handaxe-making, then presents a study of an experimentally produced handaxe and associated waste products. This forms the basis for the methodology of artefact recording which was applied to the Wood Hill Palaeolithic assemblage from Kent, and analyses of this assemblage are presented. The themes of handaxe functional efficiency and knapping skill development, developed from study of the Wood Hill assemblage, are investigated regarding handaxe morphological variability. The results of investigations (including field-survey) at the site of Dickett's Field in Hampshire are also presented, and observations and experiments to investigate the ways in which flint artefacts weather are discussed. The book concludes with a synthesis of the evidence presented. In the accompanying CD video, the author provides the commentary for a demonstration of butchery techniques using flint tools, showing the effectiveness of various shapes and sizes of cutting implements.
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2004
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Iola A Shorters (Ed.)
Detailed comparative analysis of the grave memorials in the churchyard of King's Norton, and area that has become increasingly urban in recent centuries; in that of the rural community of Wootton Wawen; and in the urban churchyards and municipal cemeteries of Birmingham. The author's aims were to examine whether aspects of local communities in different socio-economic environments were reflected in the memorials, and to discover the extent to which a well preserved graveyard is a reliable and representative database for local history. Data obtained from the memorials was compared to evidence from parish registers, and evidence from the memorials themselves, both inside and outside the churches, and from the layout of the graveyards was analysed. Includes
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2004
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon Kevin Blockley (Ed.)
Aberglasney comprises a substantial house, outbuildings, walled gardens, wooded areas, and a yew tunnel. It is situated in the Tywi valley in the Parish of Llangathen in Carmarthenshire. The Aberglasney Restoration Trust was established in 1994 to save these remains, which were in an advanced state of decay, and eventually open the gardens to the public. Archaeological involvement was required since the house and gardens were about to undergo a major scheme of restoration. The excavations aimed to remove later landscaping levels to reveal the layout of the 17th and 18th century gardens and findings confirmed that occupation started in the late 15th century, and that an extensive formal garden was laid out during the first half of the 17th century.
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2002
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon
Four contributors treat aspects of the area. Dilwyn Jones (1-25) reports on 'Aerial evidence from the survey area and its environs', giving a gazetteer of Lincs Wolds sites seen in a transect of 2km x 20 adjoining another (reported in 89/135) and containing more linear enclosures, ringditches, and complexes of prehistoric to RB sites. Patricia Phillips (27-69) writes of the 'Lincolnshire Wolds transect survey: objectives and results'; field walking of an 18km x 400m stretch revealed distributions of 'offsite' flints and of manuring as well as some settlement indications and long and round barrows. Hilary Healey (71-9) provides the 'Report on the pottery found during fieldwalking of the transect' (mostly RB, but some from all other periods). Daryl Garton, Pat Phillips, & Donald Henson, with three others, describe 'Newton Cliffs: a flint-working and settlement site in the Trent valley'; fifteen years of fieldwalking had recovered over 30 000 prehistoric artefacts. Excavations revealed an essentially undisturbed Meso knapping horizon, more diffuse Neo-BA flintwork, two pits with Beaker and rusticated pottery, and a ?structure, with numerous other prehistoric features. Analyses include piecharts of raw materials and activities (see also 89/1264).
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1989
 
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