International Journal of Historical Archaeology 15 (3)

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
International Journal of Historical Archaeology 15 (3)
Series
Series
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Series:
International Journal of Historical Archaeology
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
15 (3)
Number of Pages
Number of Pages
The number of pages in the publication or report
Number of Pages:
227
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Journal
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2011
Source
Source
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Source:
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BIAB (biab_online)
Relations
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Relations:
URI: http://www.springerlink.com/content/1092-7697/15/3/
Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
25 Aug 2012

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Abstract
Available on-line icon Eileen M Murphy
409 - 428
Cilliní'”or children's burial grounds'”were the designated resting places for unbaptized infants and other members of Irish society who were considered unsuitable by the Roman Catholic Church for burial in consecrated ground. The sites appear to have proliferated from the seventeenth century onwards in the wake of the Counter-Reformation. While a number of previous studies have attempted to relate their apparently marginal characteristics to the liminality of Limbo, evidence drawn from the archaeological record and oral history accounts is argued to suggest that it was only the Roman Catholic Church that considered cilliní, and those interred within, to be marginal. In contrast, it is argued that the evidence suggests that the families of the dead regarded the cemeteries as important places of burial and treated them in a similar manner to consecrated burial grounds.
Abstract icon
Available on-line icon David Petts
461 - 480
Explores the way in which the religious changes associated with 'home mission' campaigns affected the landscape of the lead-mining districts of the North Pennines in northern England. It is argued that a repeating cycle of preaching first outdoors, then indoors and then in purpose-built structures can be recognized.
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