Medieval Archaeology 36

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Medieval Archaeology 36
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Medieval Archaeology
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
36
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society for Medieval Archaeology
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
1992
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
20 Jan 2002

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon Märit Gaimster
1 - 28
The functions of and attitudes towards precious metals in the late Roman and early Anglo-Saxon period are considered. An interpretation of the gold bracteates as active media in social and political transactions is put forward, centred on an analysis of the complexity of different types and issues within the larger groups of finds. Comparisons are made with other early coinage, special purpose monies and other types of pendant.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Julian Henderson
Ingegerd Holand
29 - 58
Excavations at the farm of Borg on Vestvagoy Island, north Norway, yielded an imported assemblage of glass. A programme of chemical analyses has augmented typological study and led to new insights into the manufacture and exchange of glass in early medieval north west Europe.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Elisabeth Okasha
59 - 66
Three Anglo-Saxon inscribed sheaths are discussed in detail, and compared with other contemporary sheaths for small angle-backed weapons. An appendix lists all known examples.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Susan E Kruse
67 - 95
Dispersed references to weights and balances in England dating to the late Saxon period (ninth to eleventh centuries) are collated and assessed. A classification of types is presented, and comparisons drawn with Irish and Scandinavian material.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon K W B Lightfoot
96 - 163
Rumney Castle is a small ringwork close to the River Rhymney. Two phases of defensive banks, ditches and a palisade are described along with several phases of timber and stone buildings, which include a gate tower, halls and a variety of large and small buildings. During the late thirteenth century the site was converted into a manorial centre. A well-sealed coin hoard dated to c 1288 -- 1289 provides a terminus post quem for the abandonment of the site. Included in the article are notes on these topics: G C Boon `The coins' (134) and `Glass bead' (144), S Lloyd-Fern and S H Sell `Objects of iron, bronze and bone' (134--43), D R Evans `Lead objects' (144), J Parkhouse `Stone objects' (144), B E Vyner `The pottery' (145--53), G G Jones `The animal bone' (151--4), A K G Jones `Fish' (154), J L Wilkinson `Human bone' (154--5), D Williams `Plant macrofossil remains' (155--6).
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Robert Cowie
164 - 168
Description of the excavation of a portion of the waterfront embankment of Middle Saxon London.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Julien Parsons
169 - 170
A description of a copper alloy disc-headed linked pin with a gilt head. The pin is likely to have been eighth century in date and the motif on the head appears to be a Celtic-influenced Mercian design.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon E O'Brien
170 - 173
This mound which was once thought to be the site of a mass slaughter accompanying a Viking burial has been reinterpreted as an early Christian cemetery into which a Viking burial has been inserted.
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Download available from the ADS icon Marcus Roberts
173 - 178
This fragment from an Anglo-Jewish tombstone, originally discovered in the 1840s, is one of only two known Hebrew inscriptions from medieval England. It is thought to commemorate either Solomon or Shalmon, who was apparently a member of a Talmudic scholarly group.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon M A Hodder
178 - 182
This study of the settlement pattern of an area north of Birmingham is thought to provide evidence for both determinism in and discontinuity between the Roman and medieval landscapes. Neither is widely accepted in contemporary British landscape studies.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Alan G Vince
182
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Alan G Vince
183
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Beverley S Nenk
184 - 308
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 309 - 341
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 341 - 363
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 364 - 366
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 367
No Abstract icon
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