Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5

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Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
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Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
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Volume:
27
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Downloads:
archael527-173-178-musnotes.pdf (225 kB) : Download
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ADS Terms of Use and Access
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Publication Type:
Journal
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Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
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Year of Publication:
1999
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ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
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Created Date
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Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Leslie W Hepple
1 - 19
During the second half of 1599 William Camden and Robert Cotton toured the Roman wall country in Northumberland and Cumberland collecting first-hand materials for the new edition of Camden's Britannia. Britannia was the foundation of serious Roman epigraphical and archaeological study in Britain and the visit marks the start of systematic studies of the Hadrian's Wall and Cotton's collection of Roman inscribed stones (along with the difficult process of transporting them to his home in Huntingdonshire). Also discusses the sometimes disputed issues of where Camden and Cotton visited in the north and whether Cotton made a second visit to Northumberland to locate and collect inscribed stones, notably the important altars from Redesdale.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Geoffrey Martin
21 - 3
Considers two objects (a gold pectoral cross and a portable altar) which are decorated with a similar abstract design and a third (St Cuthbert's coffin lid) with a figural version of the same composition. The design, widely used in early Byzantium and later in Western Europe as a symbol of sanctity, is that of a `Quaternity' representation of the four evangelists who spread the message of Christianity, set around the `Unity' who brought the message to the world, Christ (ie four symbols grouped round a fifth).
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Andrew Breeze
25 - 7
Refers to Tarset Castle (near Bellingham) and the use of cumeman in a writ of Henry I sometime between 1114 and 1118.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon J Teasdale
29 - 43
In 1995 three investigation trenches were excavated locating the foundations of two phases of the town wall. They also demonstrated that a depth of up to 2.35m of medieval and later deposits survived below present ground level. The excavated areas of inner wall-face were drawn and added to an existing photogrammetric survey. The only visible elevation of outer wall-face was also recorded.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Alan Williams
Philip N Wood
45 - 74
Revealed the first archaeological sequence of occupation within an area of the medieval Old Borough which lay to the west of the Framwellgate bridgehead. Dumping of sandy loams containing thirteenth-century pottery on the southern edge of the valley of the Milburn was temporarily halted for the construction of a series of features including a cess pit and a corn-drying kiln (the last firing of which was dated by archaeomagnetic analysis to the fourteenth- or early-fifteenth century). The resumption of dumping sealed these features and terminated with the construction of a very substantial revetment wall along the edge of the Milburn slope flanked walkway with a sunken feature beyond. Demolition of this wall and the lowering of the ground surface on its southern flank preceded the insertion of parallel freestanding tenement walls running back from the Crossgate frontage. The western wall, at least, terminated in a vertical and finished face on the edge of the slope down to the Milburn. Exactly when this occurred is uncertain although it was certainly not before the later sixteenth century. By the eighteenth century buildings bounded the area of excavation, those to the south subsumed but conformed to the alignment of the freestanding boundary walls and the building to the north was constructed against an extension of the western burgage boundary. Nineteenth-century developments included the insertion of a brick linking structure between buildings I and II (those to the south) associated with cobbled yards. Developments in the 1950s destroyed large areas of archaeological deposits in the angle of land between Crossgate and North Road prior to the 1995 development. There are notes on the `Medieval pottery' by Lucy Whittingham (62--7), `Post medieval pottery' (67--70) and `Clay pipes' (70 & 71) by Jenny Vaughan, `Vertebrate and marine mollusc remains' Sue Stallibrass (70--2), `Palaeoenvironmental analysis' by Jacqui Huntley (72--3), and the `Recording of standing fabric' by Peter Ryder (73).
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon W B Griffiths
75 - 108
A combined excavation and watching brief conducted during the laying of a new sewerage system revealed that the area had been reclaimed in the eighteenth century, prior to which it had been a tidal foreshore used for waste dumping. The semi-waterlogged conditions preserved organic matter, principally wood and leather artefacts, as well as pottery and bone, and a large quantity of finds. The paucity of archaeological work in the town lends additional value to the assemblage. There are specialist notes on: `The pottery' by A Jenner (83--91); `Other finds' by A Rowntree (91--100); `The animal bones' by L J Gidney (100--2); `Environmental samples' by J Huntley (103--5).
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Miranda Threlfall-Holmes
109 - 22
An article using the iron purchases of Durham Cathedral Priory, as recorded in the bursars' account rolls for 1464 to 1520, to shed light on the location, extent and personnel of iron production and trade in the north-east of England towards the end of the Middle Ages. It is observed that locally-produced iron took over from imported iron in the mid--1480s, and explanations for this change are discussed. It is suggested that the local iron industry was in expansion earlier than had been previously thought. The location of the industry is discussed and suppliers' names listed. Several differences between suppliers of imported and local iron are noted.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Barbara Harbottle
David Heslop
123 - 34
A programme of recording and conservation work took place between 1995 and 1997. It is likely that the chapel was founded in the thirteenth century and the Grey tomb in the fifteenth.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Jerome de Groot
135 - 44
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon P J Fitzpatrick
145 - 54
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Spence Galbraith
155 - 170
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 171 - 172
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon R W Rennison
171 - 172
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Clive Waddington
David Schofield
David Sherlock
173 - 178
`Recent lithic finds from Bowden Doors' (some Meso) by Clive Waddington (173--4), `A new stone axe source in the Northumberland Cheviots' by David Schofield & Clive Waddington (175--6), `Silver spoon from Benwell Roman fort' by David Sherlock (176--8).
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Clive Waddington
173 - 174
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David Schofield
175 - 176
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David Sherlock
176 - 178
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 179 - 180
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
179
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
179
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
179 - 180
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
180
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Roger W Fern
181 - 191
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 192
No Abstract icon