Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
36
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2007
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
Article Title Sort Order no arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
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Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 0
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
1 - 10
Reflects on the history of the publication and some of the issues involved in producing the latest version, a near complete re-write of its predecessors.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Timothy Gates
R J Hewitt
11 - 30
Several new Roman temporary camps were recorded by air photography in Northumberland in the 1990s, including three sites on the line of the Devil's Causeway and another in the lower Tweed valley at Mindrum. Transcriptions of these sites are presented here for the first time, and their possible relationship to the Devil's Causeway is discussed.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Duncan N Hale
31 - 77
Presents the results of archaeological investigations between 2002 and 2005, prior to and during development of the area. These included archaeological excavations, topographical surveys, watching briefs, and the recording of bastle houses and other structures. This revealed: Neolithic cairnfields and other Neolithic and Bronze Age remains at Bellshiel Law and Todlaw Pike; a Roman Camp at Bellshiel and other Roman military remains; medieval and post-medieval settlement remains; and several bastles. PP-B\r\n
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Quita Mould
Alan G Vince
79 - 92
A re-examination of the evidence for the dating of the 1974 excavations, based mainly on the leatherwork and non-local pottery, suggests that the first occupation of the site took place after the Norman Conquest rather than in the tenth century and that a Durham origin for 'Durham ware' is at best unproven, with Newcastle upon Tyne being a more likely source. The implications of this re-interpretation for the history of the pottery industry in northeast England are explored.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon M L Holford
93 - 110
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon John Nolan
111 - 123
Concentrates on the historic core of the town, revisiting aspects of Manders' History in the light of archaeological excavations and desk-based studies carried out since 1973.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Jenny Vaughan
John Nolan
125 - 249
Excavations at two sites on the east side of Oakwellgate revealed archaeological deposits and features dating from the twelfth - twentieth centuries. The principal area of investigation was centred on the former Rectory site, with a smaller area to the south (formerly a medieval burgage plot). No trace of Roman occupation was found, a marked contrast to the extensive evidence of settlement found to the west at Bottle Bank, nor was there any evidence to support the long-held belief that an early church stood to the east of the twelfth century St Mary's Church. At the Rectory, features and pottery dating from the twelfth century suggest that the site was certainly occupied at the time of the first recorded rector in 1275. Substantial structural remains of the post-medieval building were found, including what appear to have been garden features. North of the Rectory were traces of a brick kiln, and waste from clay tobacco pipe manufacture in the mid-seventeenth and eighteenth centuries provided evidence for an industry of which Gateshead was, for a time, the centre on Tyneside.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Jenny Vaughan
251 - 255
The assemblages recovered from the Bottle Bank and Oakwellgate sites in Gateshead, although relatively small, have allowed a clearer picture of the changes and developments in pottery usage in the seventeenth century to emerge. At the same time new questions have been generated.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon A F Roberts
R A Fairbairn
257 - 266
The shielings at this site have never been described, though a number of them are clearly marked on the first edition Ordnance Survey map and more have been revealed by a detailed survey of the area. Between sixteen and twenty-one dwellings are identified. These are divided into three groups based on the width of the gable; most are multi-chambered, including some with extensions and some with associated stock enclosures, though there are also smaller, single room structures.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Robin L Plackett
267 - 274
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Margaret Wills
275 - 308
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Paul Gailiunas
309 - 323
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Adrian G Osler
325 - 339
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon R W Rennison
341 - 362
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 363 - 368
1. A Roman folding spoon from Wallsend, David Sherlock, 363-365, fig, refs\r\nDescribes the spoon, made of bronze with a handle in the form of a crouching feline.\r\n2. Nodding scholars, or how an old tile-stamp from Carlisle became a 'new' tile-stamp from Corbridge, M.C. Bishop, 366, refs. Notes the misidentification of a tile-stamp by the author.\r\n3. Celtic Philology and the River Bowmont, Andrew Breeze, 367-368, refs\r\nSuggests that the name of the river is in part derived from a Brittonic term. PP-B
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David Sherlock
363 - 365
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Mike C Bishop
366
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Andrew Breeze
367 - 368
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 369 - 378
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Paul T Bidwell
369
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
371 - 372
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Adam T Welfare
372 - 376
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David Lovie
376 - 377
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Elizabeth Ashton
378
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 379 - 380
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Constance M Fraser
381 - 382
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Roger W Fern
383 - 406
No Abstract icon
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No Abstract icon
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No Abstract icon
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No Abstract icon