Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
39
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2010
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
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Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
Brenda Heywood
1 - 7
An original causeway of boulder clay, revetted in neatly coursed stones, was discovered in 1950 across the Vallum, well to the south of the fort at Great Chesters. No evidence for a monumental gateway was found. The ditch was filled with silt when it was capped by a layer of clay on which lay a secondary road surface overlapping the eastern part of the causeway. To the east of the fort, two ditches were located which may correspond to the two outer ditches to the west.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Mark Corby
9 - 13
The defence of North Britain is considered from the viewpoint of a modern army officer. Hadrian's Wall played only a minor role compared to that of the cavalry in the Advance Forts; the effectiveness of their patrols to the North of the Wall is stressed, in a strategy that relied upon reconnaissance, concentration and interception.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Matthias Egeler
15 - 23
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Anthony R Birley
Andrew Birley
25 - 51
In 2009, two large alters were excavated side by side in the north-west quadrant of the third-century stone fort at Vindolanda, evidently inside a temple. A third, smaller altar was found just outside the temple. The relief on the main altar is a notable addition to the inscriptions and images of the Dolichenus cult in Britain. This article deals first with the excavation, then the alters, gives a brief account of the cult in general, with particular reference to Britain, and finally offers some reflections on the two cohorts.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Paul T Bidwell
53 - 145
The Anglo-Saxon crypt at Hexham now lies below the nave of the Abbey. This article provides an in-depth account of the crypt, the fullest yet published, and the results of the first structural survey since one undertaken more than 120 years ago. An early history of the crypt, and its rediscovery and subsequent history until the 1880s, is provided; a background to the modern research is then given. The sources of the reused Roman stonework are described, and the survival and demolition of the Roman structures discussed. Roman and Medieval quarries and the quantities of stone required for the original church and other buildings at Hexham are also discussed. The details of the survey of the crypt are then presented. The construction of the crypt, possible antecedents to the ribbed vaults, the plaster surfaces and other features of the crypt are considered, before a concluding discussion of Roman ruins and Anglo-Saxon churches.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Barbara Harbottle
John Nolan
Jenny Vaughan
147 - 287
This cemetery, which may have its origins in the late seventh century AD, overlies the remains of the Roman fort of Pons Aelius, occupying a headland site on the north bank of the River Tyne. In 1080 the 'New Castle upon Tyne' was constructed on the headland, reputed by some 12th-century chroniclers to have previously been the site of a Christian community called Monkchester. This report describes and discusses the results of the excavations of the cemetery, including the impact of the 'New Castle' and the later refortification. This is not considered to be a final or definitive statement on the cemetery, but does attempt to synthesis 13 seasons of excavation. Study of the skeletal remains is continuing and it is likely that the results of future analysis may revise some of the conclusions presented here. Similarly, the suggested presence of a late Saxon stone church, and a possible smaller predecessor, will almost certainly be a subject of further research and, perhaps, re-interpretation.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Nicholas Orme
289 - 305
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Elizabeth Gemmill
Ben Dodds
Phillipp R Schofield
307 - 327
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon G Brogan
329 - 374
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon John E Clark
375 - 400
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Alan Williams
Patrick Taylor
401 - 425
At least 10 disused wooden vessels were hulked on the foreshore of the River Tyne opposite the village of Newburn between the 1940s and 1960s. They are seen in a series of photographs taken in the 1960s. The assemblage was archaeologically recorded in 2009, by which time the site consisted of 5 very reduced hulls and a dispersed scatter of parts. This paper describes the remains, concentrating on the construction, development and use of the predominant type on the site, the Tyne wherry.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 427 - 438
In 2009 the Society purchased two bronze Paterae,following their discovery by two metal detectorists in Whittington parish. They are described here, along with the details of other Paterae in the Society's collection.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Lindsay Allason-Jones
427 - 432
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Louise Keech
432 - 438
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 439 - 443
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
439 - 440
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Nick Hodgson
440 - 441
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Humphrey G Welfare
441 - 442
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Humphrey G Welfare
442
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
442 - 443
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Roger W Fern
445 - 461
No Abstract icon
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No Abstract icon
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No Abstract icon