Series: Wessex Archaeology unpublished report series

Wessex Archaeology
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Primary Contact: Chris Brayne: email
Associated OrganisationWessex Archaeology
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Year of Publication (Start): 1990
Year of Publication (End): 2911
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Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon G Chaffey
O Good
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by AEE Renewables UK 12 Limited to undertake a trial trench evaluation at Coombeshead Farm, Diptford, Devon, The archaeological trial trenching over two areas of the Site comprised the excavation of sixteen 20m trenches, one 40m and one 60m trench. All trenches measured 1.8m in width. All trenches were targeted on anomalies identified in an earlier geophysical survey, in particular a large sub-oval enclosure located in the northern part of the Site. The evaluation identified limited evidence for archaeological remains within the areas investigated on the Site, whether features or finds. However, the evaluation was able to confirm and identify the ditches of a sub-oval enclosure possibly of Romano-British date. Observations during the evaluation partially confirmed the results of geophysical survey. It was noted, that a number of the strong geophysical anomalies were archaeological features albeit pertaining to shallow linear ditch or gully features, and a single posthole and possible pit. No dateable material was recovered from these features. Other geophysical anomalies that had been targeted were shown either not to be present or as a result of the natural underlying geology. Apart from the identification of the enclosure the evaluation has indicated a low potential for the presence of archaeological remains at the Site. Due to the potential significance of the enclosure however, the Client is proposing to remove this area of the Site from the proposed development
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2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Newton
P Olsen
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by PAL Properties Ltd to carry out an archaeological trial trench evaluation on land proposed for a housing development at Aurum, Crockford Lane, Chineham, Basingstoke, Hampshire. The proposed archaeological trial trenching comprised the excavation of 11 x 30 m x 2 m trenches targeted on the proposed housing development and green spaces. These trenches were numbered 3-13, numbers 1 and 2 having been excavated during a previous phase of works. The work took place between 20th and 23rd June 2016. Although undated, it is possible that the linear features noted in Trench 4 and, less likely, Trench 3, represent outlying field boundaries associated with the Iron Age/Romano-British settlement to the north. The evaluation also demonstrated the absence of the Roman Road that was projected to cross the site.
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2016
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Dawson
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by CgMs Consulting Ltd to undertake the final reporting for historic building recording at Grange Farm, Hereward's Road, Norton, Sheffield, South Yorkshire centred on National Grid Reference (NGR) SK 3690 8221. Grange Farm was a Grade II listed building, located within the Norton area of Sheffield, to the south of the city centre. It is bounded by Hereward's Road to the northwest and Bochum Parkway to the south and east. The farm was set surrounded by small fields, within the Oakes Park Conservation Area, and just outside the Grade II registered park/garden of The Oakes. The farm comprised a '['-shaped range which included a farm house with cruck framed wing, animal stalls and a barn, with a second smaller linear range to the south comprising small farm outbuildings and barn. The earliest phase of the complex was the cruck framed wing of the farmhouse which dated to 1599. The farm then expanded throughout the early 17th century to the mid- 20th century over 10 main phases, before its final demise in the early 21st century with subsequent demolition. A programme of historic building recording was carried out at the Site in 2006 by JSAC. The analysis by Wessex Archaeology of the records made has identified 10 phases of building and alteration following the sites initial construction in the late 16th century. The Site's layout and architectural style was typical of a post-medieval rural farm complex within the Sheffield area.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Dawson
Archaeological assessment and buildings appraisal, including laser scan survey of Mousehole Forge, Sheffield.
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2014
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Tuck
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Heeley City Farm to carry out two seasons of geophysical survey and archaeological trial trenching within the playing field of Tinsley Junior School (Figure 1, hereafter 'the Site'), as part of a community based heritage project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The Site is approximately centred on NGR 440195 390558, located off Bawtry Road, Tinsley, Sheffield. The project has been successful at engaging the community, including the staff and pupils of Tinsley School, volunteers, at Tinsley Community Forum, St Lawrence's Church, the Asian Women's Group and Brinsworth Local Heritage Group. Desk-based research has expanded our knowledge of the manor from documentary sources and has recorded oral history testimony and photographs belonging to members of the community. Sandstone lime-mortared walls were seen that tied in closely with the 1934 OS 1:2500 map of the manor house, and therefore likely represent the foundations of the manor house of the 15th century or earlier. In addition, cobble surfaces associated with these walls were seen, as well as deposits interpreted as bedding layers for removed floors. The site was landscaped after the demolition of the buildings in the 1960s. This landscaping has truncated and damaged the remains to some extent, although preservation is generally good and a valuable archaeological resource is present on the Site. Tinsley Junior School has now relocated to Tinsley Meadows and the site of the former school is proposed as a public park.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon G Wakeham
L Newton
Archaeological watching brief during groundworks associated with the construction of an extension to the residential property of 'Tanglewood', Winterborne Stickland, Dorset (NGR 382972 104388), in response to a planning condition. The watching brief was carried out on 5th October 2016. No archaeological features, deposits or finds were recorded during the course of the watching brief. The overlying garden soils had been disturbed and reworked, probably during a previous side extension to the property, though the underlying natural deposits did not seem to have been widely truncated or impacted from this modern activity. The underlying natural was variable, with clay, flint gravel and degraded chalk all recorded within the excavated foundation trenches.
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2016
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Fairhead
Evaluation trench targeted over GPR anomaly
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2014
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Clelland
A Manning
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned to undertake an archaeological watching brief during underpinning and associated groundworks undertaken during the refurbishment of adjoined semi-detached cottages located at 1 and 2 Court Farm, Bere Regis, Dorset, centred on National Grid Reference (NGR) 384890 94670. The Court Farm cottages lie within the limits of an historic manorial settlement which is a Scheduled Monument (SM1015352). The Archaeological watching brief was undertaken between 25th October and 12th December 2011 and comprised the monitoring of four test-pits, seventeen underpinning holes, two soakaways and associated drainage trenches and an oil line trench and revealed a consistent sequence of archaeological features and deposits. Examination of the foundations around the building confirmed the stone foundations of the south-western gable end of the western wing of the farmhouse were clearly different from that seen elsewhere and potentially of medieval origin. The remainder of the archaeological structural remains and deposits recorded during the watching brief were of undoubted post-medieval or modern origin. The south-eastern cornerstone of the northern rear extension to the original farmhouse, with its chamfered edge and fleur-de-lys motif, is the most striking example of the re-use of worked stone blocks.
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2012
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In March 2015 Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Mr and Mrs Dexter (the Client) to undertake an archaeological watching brief on the proposed site of a new garage at 1 Church Cottages, Church Lane, Barkham, Berkshire, centred on Ordnance Survey National Grid Reference SU 78430 66353. A planning application (F/2013/1704) has been granted conditional consent by Wokingham Borough Council (the Local Planning Authority (LPA)) for the demolition of the existing detached double garage and erection of a detached double garage in a revised position. The site of the proposed garage is adjacent to the Grade II Listed Building, 1 Church Cottages and lies within a medieval moated enclosure which is a designated Scheduled Monument. The scheme will create a new garage located at an increased distance from the moat with improved access which is more sympathetically related to the adjacent Grade II listed cottage. The watching brief comprised the below ground excavation of the footings for the footprint of the new garage. The footings were excavated to a depth of 1.2m. The watching did not reveal any archaeological features and the only archaeological material found was modern ceramic building material from within the topsoil.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon P Orczewski
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Hampshire and Regional Property Group Ltd on behalf of PMC Construction and Development Services Ltd to undertake a programme of archaeological trial trenching at 10-12 Queensway, Southampton, Hampshire, centred on National Grid Reference (NGR) 442210 111208. The works were required as a planning condition in advance of the demolition of the existing buildings and the development of residential accommodation. The evaluation consisted of three trenches, which all encountered modern and post-medieval deposits beneath the concrete floor of the warehouse building. Natural geology was found at a depth of 1.5m below the top of the concrete level. A very small quantity of finds was recovered from post-medieval layers overlying natural geology and consisted of undatable two small fragments of clay pipe stem and a single fragment of possibly residual medieval fine glazed ware. The remains of a backfilled brick cellar were also noted, confirming the previous existence of 19th century buildings within the site. The fieldwork was carried out between 24th and 25th of October 2013.
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2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon R Wills
P A Harding
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by MHGL Properties Ltd, on behalf of Hurst Financial Services, to undertake an archaeological watching brief at 10 Church Road, Idmiston, Salisbury, Wiltshire. The watching brief was to fulfil an archaeological condition placed on the consent for a planning application to Wiltshire County Council (13/01181/FUL) The works included the extension of the current dwelling, 10 Church Road and demolition of a garage and outbuildings to create a plot footprint for a new dwelling and detached garage. The watching brief revealed that the base of the coombe, in which Church Road is located, is filled with deposits of colluvium, over 1 m thick. The colluvium feathers out upslope and is replaced by periglacial chalk. No significant archaeological features or deposits were observed during the groundworks.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon David Fallon
L Jarvis
An archaeological watching brief during the constriction of a new six storey academic building known as the 10 West development, University of Bath, Claverton Down, centred on National Grid reference (NGR) 376997 164539. The watching brief entailed the monitoring of the reduction of the current ground level within the site boundaries in advance of the proposed development. The work was undertaken from the 28th of October 2014 to the 15th January 2015. The works revealed widespread landscaping had previously occurred within the development footprint resulting in extensive disturbance of the natural deposits with substantial amounts of made-ground being deposited across the site. No archaeological features or deposits were observed.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Mick Rawlings
Three ditches of Romano-British date were recorded in the cable trench section. All of these were aligned north/south as far as was possible to discern in the narrow cable trench. Two of the ditches were 5.9 metres apart, and appeared to represent one element of a rectilinear pattern of roads or trackways recorded on aerial photographs. These particular ditches were part of a north/south road located to the south of the town of Alchester. Two sherds of central Gaulish Samian pottery of early 2nd century AD were recovered from the fill of a ditch in the eastern extent of the trench. This feature was probably the northernmost roadside ditch of a road also recorded on an aerial photograph plot, running perpendicular to the roadside ditches to the west, although it appeared to be aligned more north/south when seen in section. No evidence of any road surfaces were found. A number of unstratified Romano-British potsherds and fragments of animal bone were recovered from the topsoil/subsoil horizon along the trench. The pottery was indicative of settlement activity in the area from the 1st-3rd centuries AD. [Au(abr)]
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1999
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Robert Williams
Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Sam Lawn Road Ltd to carry out an archaeological watching brief in order to fulfil a planning condition (ref. 16/00740/FUL) relating to the demolition and redevelopment of a new building at 11 Lawn Road, Southampton, Hampshire, centred on National Grid Reference 442761 113637. 11 Lawn Road occupies a 0.6 hectare rectangular parcel of land, on a terrace slightly above Lawn Road, the ground sloping gently down from the north. The works monitored included the excavation of a large attenuation tank, a soak-away and the subsequent removal of overburden from the Site, followed by the excavation of footings for the new building. In situ brickearth deposits were noted across the Site, overlying gravel. A single flint flake was the only pre-18th-century find. However, the watching brief located a buried land surface containing bricks in the north of what was probably a garden associated with Portswood House, built in 1776 and demolished in 1852. The ground surface was subsequently raised by up to 1.2 m in the north of the Site, probably when Lawn Road was laid out, the redeposited gravels sealing the buried soil. Features likely to have been associated with the later 19th century villa that occupied the site, which was demolished after a bomb strike in 1944, included two brick-lined wells. Features of 20th-century comprised a brick-built interceptor tank, a well and the concrete footings and wall of a cellar. The watching brief was conducted over a period of 11 days between 11 December 2017 and 19th January 2018.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Ellis
Wessex Archaeology carried out an evaluation in advance of the redevelopment of the site as housing and office accommodation. A number of brick- and stone-built 18th-19th century structures, including walls, floors and culverts, were recorded, some of which relate to laundry structures shown on late 1th/early 20th century maps. The larger of the two brick culverts is slightly to the east of the line of the early medieval boundary between Putney and Wandsworth parishes, which probably originated as a boundary between two Late Saxon estates. A series of deposits containing copper smelting waste, probably of 18th-19th century date were recorded, although these are thought to have been brought in to the site as hard core or levelling material.
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2008
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Two evaluation trenches were excavated by Wessex Archaeology on the site of a former warehouse. No archaeological features were observed and no finds were recovered. A sequence of alluvial clays and organic peats overlying sands and gravels was exposed beneath 1m of modern disturbance which had removed evidence of any former topsoil; the sequence was sampled. It appears that the site was wetland and marshland until drainage and the development of Canning Town were undertaken in the 19th century.
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2005
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Fairhead
Archaeological Watching brief during ground works associated with an extension to the rear of the property. The watching brief took place on 3rd August 2016, no archaeological features or deposits were encountered.
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2016
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An evaluation was carried out by Wessex Archaeology in advance of redevlopment. A single trench excavated in the northern part of the site uncovered the remains of a petrol holding tank and backfilled cellar. A brick-built wall provided evidence of the 19th-century building fronting onto the High Street of which the backfilled cellar had been part. No evidence of activity pre-dating the 19th century was observed and it was concluded that any archaeological deposits on the property frontage had probably been either destroyed or very much truncated.
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2006
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A watching brief was carried out by Wessex Archaeology during the drilling of five geotechnical window samples and two boreholes at the site of a former garage. To avoid petrol tanks, the interventions were located at the north and around the southern sides of the site. Backfilled voids, thought to be the infilled cellars of houses built before 1896, were encountered in two window samples toward the east corner of the site and possibly also in a third at its northern apex. Made ground was recorded in the two window samples at the south-west and south of the site and in the two boreholes. All except one intervention reached natural gravel. No archaeological deposits were recorded.
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2005
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A watching brief was carried out by Wessex Archaeology during the removal of petrol holding tanks; it followed an earlier watching brief and evaluation at the site. The front walls of the cellars of a terrace of houses built during the late 19th century, and later demolished, were observed. The cellars had were infilled with brick rubble and it was through this that the petrol holding tanks had been installed. No archaeological deposits or finds of significance were recorded.
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2006
 
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