Series: AOC Archaeology unpublished report series

AOC Archaeology Group
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Year of Publication (Start): 1992
Year of Publication (End): 2019
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Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C C Edwards
The watching brief was conducted on 11 trenches which included underpinning pits; lift pit, manholes and drainage works. Natural terrace gravels and sand were observed in all excavated trenches, many indicating banding which suggests undisturbed deposits. Only a single possible pit was recorded and has been interpreted as being post medieval in date. The footings of the current building were also exposed during the works. No significant archaeological features were recorded on site.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Watt
AOC Archaeology Group was commissioned by Freelands Developments Ltd to undertake an archaeological watching brief and evaluation in the area associated with 4 Freelands Road. This initially consisted of test pitting with a later archaeological evaluation being undertaken prior to the excavation of the intended new house plots, as agreed with the CEC Archaeology Service. No significant archaeological features were uncovered.
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2016
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon E Hindmarch
AOC Archaeology Group were commisioned to under take an archaeological watching brief on the removal of hard standing followed by evaluation trenching on a site due to undergo development within Airdrie. The works were required due to the sites location being in the historic core of the town. The archaeological works showed that made ground existed directly above the natural clay over the whole site. However the remains of 19th century building foundations were located at the eastern end of the site where minermal modern development had occured. These remains existed within the natural clay and can be traced on the 19th century maps of the area such as the 1st edition OS map. E Hindmarch 2008
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2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Capon
a 2 trench evaluation in close proximity to 1996 excavations that uncovered prehistoric and Roman activity uncovered a late medieval/early post medieval ditch run, possibly a boundary of an early phase of a parsonage or rectory that stood near the site.
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2009
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon H MacQuarrie
AOC completed a two day watching brief on ground works associated with an extension to 'Thameside', Sutton Road, Cookham. A series of undated alluvial deposits were recorded, sealed with a late post medieval deposit. The investigation achieved its aims in establishing the absence of archaeological features in the foundation trenches associated with the proposed development.
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Capon
A programme of Historic Building Recording was undertaken at a pair of small buildings at 1, Church Road, Kingston-upon-Thames. Both are of 19th century date, and are outbuildings, probably a stable and carriagehouse, used by occupants of the adjacent Cambridge House. A planning application has been made for demolition of these properties. Both of the buildings are approaching dilapidation, and are largely empty of fittings that indicate historical function. The current wall finishes and decoration obscures all subtler historical structural details other than evidence for later phases of blocking. Block B, the larger building, appears to have been used as a stable and carriage house, with accommodation and hayloft above, whilst the function of the smaller block is unclear.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Capon
Archaeological monitoring, on behalf of Ballymore Millharbour Limited was undertaken on preparatory works for the construction of foundations for a new development at 1, Millharbour, on the Isle of Dogs, London. The site had formerly held office buildings on close-piled foundations. The monitoring was conducted on probing for intrusions within the location of piles from the previous building, on 2nd September 2005. The probing reached a depth of 4m below ground surface. Made ground was observed to a depth of 3.80m, and the top of alluvial silt was seen below this. No layers or features of any archaeological significance were recorded.
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2005
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon T Fidler
3 trench evaluation. Natural horizon is orange sandy gravels. 19th-20th century brick structures, likely to be associated to the demolished building on site. Heavily truncated.
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2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon T Fidler
3 trench evaluation. Natural horizon is orange sandy gravels. 19th-20th century brick structures, likely to be associated to the demolished building on site. Heavily truncated.
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2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J Winfer
An archaeological evaluation consisting of one machine excavated trench measuring 10m by 1.8m. The only feature encountered truncating natural clay deposits was a fibreglass lined soakaway which was cut through made ground and a layer of original topsoil.
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2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Martin Cook
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken in advance of the proposed redevelopment of a former office block and associated backlands at 1-5 Baxter's place, Edinburgh. The evaluation comprised the machine excavation of three trenches totalling 120 m2 representing a 10% sample of the area. The whole of the backland area was found to have been seriously truncated by the development of Baxter's Place and the later extension and it seems likely that any earlier deposits have been removed by this action. Neither significant archaeological features nor artefacts were identified.
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2008
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Clarke
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken by AOC Archaeology Group at the site of 1 - 6 Watlington Street, Nettlebed,monitoring a programme of residential construction works. The sequence of deposits identified during the watching brief were of limited archaeological significance.The earliest archaeological feature encountered was a partial chalk lined well, with an unknown date of construction, although it is recorded as being backfilled during the late 18th to 20th century. Two brick lined wells/soakaways and part of a backfilled basement associated with the 19th century, were also identified.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon K Paton
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by AOC Archaeology Group on land previously occupied by warehouses and offices at 1-7 Baileyfield Crescent, Portobello, Edinburgh. The evaluation revealed that the phase 1 area consists of modern hard standing covering over 4 m of dumped material that dates from the early 19th century to the middle of the 20th century. The trenches and test pits conducted found numerous dumped deposits throughout the evaluation area, with tip lines present throughout each trench indicating that the dumped material was being brought into the site from the northern edge. A probable brick floor relating to a late 19th century building was also revealed within trench 5 at a depth of 3.1 m. Some samples of the pottery and glass that were contained within some of the dumped horizons have been recovered for further analysis.
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Kinirons
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken by AOC Archaeology Group on land previously occupied by warehouses and offices at 1-7 Baileyfield Crescent, Portobello, Edinburgh, during the excavation of a SUDS Pond. The SUDS Pond area was located to the immediate south of the Phase 2 excavation undertaken on the site of the Abercorn Brickworks in 2017. The SUDS Pond measured approximately 80m2 in area and its excavation removed around 2080m3 of made ground to a depth of around 5m. The watching brief revealed a made ground composed of ash, rubble and loose silty sand. Several small dumps of early 20th century glass, ceramics and bricks were observed. The made ground represents the infilling and levelling of the area during the late 19th and early 20th centuries with waste material from the surrounding industries. No structural remains associated with the Brick and Tile Works shown to exist within the area were observed.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon I Hogg
The work constisted of the excavation of geotechnical pits within the basement of the existing building followed by archaeological test pits within the yard to the south of the building. The pits within the basement identified significant truncation by the existing building. One pit identified partially articulated dog skeletons. The three archaeological pits identified brick structures and a burnt sandstone feature, which probably had an industrial function. These deposits are likely to date to the mid 18th century. A subsequent excavation took place inwhich various phases of post medieval structures were found dating from the 18th and 19th century including wells, drains and basements and the foundation of the mews house previously on the site.
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2009
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon M Statton
The evaluation comprised the excavation of two trenches measuring 9.30m x 1.80m and 10.50m x 1.80m to depths of 1.50m and 1.00m, respectively. The evaluation was designed to provide information on the character, extent, date and state of preservation of any below ground archaeological remains that may be present within the development area. The natural mid brown sand horizon was encountered in both trenches and recorded at a height of between 60.90mOD and 61.05mOD. Both trenches suggested the natural horizon had been previously disturbed with significant truncation observed in Trench 1. The brick wall in Trench 2 is likely to relate to cartographic evidence from the 1897 OS map and is likely to represent part of the garden wall of Jubilee Cottages. The ceramic assemblage recovered from Trench 2 dates to the late 19th or early 20th century and is most likely related to later development of the site. The linear features in Trenches 1 and 2 could not be confidently dated due to truncation from later building work, most notably the foundations of the possible cellar in Trench 1, but these are likely to be early 20th century in date. They may represent further garden related features.
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Clarke
Between the 27th April and 24th July 2006 an archaeological watching brief was undertaken to observe ground beam excavation for a residential development at 10 to 30 Church Street, Old Isleworth, on behalf of Capital City Developments. The ground works undertaken were of limited impact, with only 20th century made ground observed across the area of the site. No significant archaeological remains or finds were identified.
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2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J Winfer
Two trench, one 5m and one 3m, evaluation.
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2014
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon L Capon
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by AOC Archaeology Group in March 2007 near the western edge of the Roman settlement of Southwark, on Union Street, SE1. This phase of work followed on from an earlier evaluation undertaken in November 2006. The aim of the evaluation was to assess the impact of the proposed redevelopment on any surviving archaeological remains. The previous investigation comprised two machine-excavated trenches within a car park area at the western end of the development (known as Area 1) covering specifically 130 to 142 Union Street. The Roman soil horizon was identified, and a single feature was recorded: a boundary ditch of early 2nd century date. Significant truncations had removed much of the archaeological potential. The current phase of work covered specifically 100 to 112 Union Street and is known as Area 4. The evaluation comprised the machine excavation of two trenches. Two features of Roman date were identified; a pit, probably for domestic waste material, and a linear cut feature, possibly a boundary marker. Both trenches revealed truncation by later activity, predominantly dating to the 19th century.
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2006
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Clarke
The evaluation consisted of one machine excavated trench. The only features encountered truncating natural clay deposits were associated with the mid 20th century demolition and clearance of the site, with the features subsequently overlain by made ground deposits.
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2013
 
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