Series: Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology unpublished report series

Stoke-on-Trent City Council
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Primary Contact: Jonathan Goodwin: email
Associated OrganisationStoke-on-Trent Archaeology
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Year of Publication (Start): 1995
Year of Publication (End): 2020
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Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Sheale
No Abstract icon
1995
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Sheale
No Abstract icon
1995
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D Slatcher
No Abstract icon
1995
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Anon
No Abstract icon
1995
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon R Cramp
Z Sutherland
Prior to redevelopment, an historic building appraisal was undertaken at the former Enson Works pottery manufactory and adjacent buildings located on Chelson Street/Normacot Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent . The appraisal involved the visual inspection and description of all accessible rooms/areas; the verification/annotation of existing architect's drawings for the site; and the recording of the present buildings by means of 35mm monochrome and colour digital photography. The appraisal identified the historical development of the Enson Works and adjacent buildings. It revealed that vestiges of the original pottery factory survive within the fabric of the present complex, but that these have been much altered and truncated by several phases of later development. A conclusive determination of the past process flow within the works could not be made due to the lack of surviving structural evidence and diagnostic fixtures and fittings. The America Hotel comprises at least two phases of development and the third building to be considered, number 101 Normacot Road, may have its origins in a building present on site by 1856, but has been much altered in subsequent years.
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2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out the archaeological building recording of A Block of the City General Hospital prior to partial demolition. The surveyed building is Grade II Listed and formed part of the Stoke-upon Trent Union Workhouse. It was originally built as a school in 1866 to the designs of local architect Charles Lynam. Only limited access to the building was possible during the survey, as it was still in use as part of the hospital site. It was, however, possible to establish the originally layout, which comprised a central block containing staff rooms with separate wings for boys and girls on each side, with ground-floor school rooms and first floor dormitories. Ranges to the rear of the building included an infants range, childrens' dining room, kitchen and laundry. The building was used as accommodation for men over the age of 60 from 1900/1901 onwards, following the removal of the children to Cottage Homes in Penkhull. Alterations to the rear range, originally the kitchen and laundry area, appear to date to this period. Later alterations to the building include the subdivision of the school rooms and dormitories into a series of rooms for the accommodation of hospital patients, and the construction of a pre-fabricated administrative block to the rear of the building.
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out an archaeological building recording at Brownhills High School, Brownhills Road, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent. The building recording focused on the original school building at the south side of the modern complex. It was constructed from 1927-30 as a girls' secondary grammar school and was one of the first schools to be built in Stoke-on-Trent after the end of the First World War. The building façade was neo-Georgian in style and was of the popular pavilion plan with blocks arranged around a quadrangle divided into two separate courtyards by a central assembly hall. The original school building had both general-purpose classrooms and specialist science laboratories and art rooms, most of which have retained their original functions. Facilities for the original school building were also located within Brownhills Hall, perhaps utilised as a cost saving measure in the hard economic times of the inter-war years. The school was extended to the north of the current building between 1937 and 1950 and to the west between 1950 and 1963. The demolition of Brownhills Hall took place between 1963 and 1974 along with further extensions to the school.
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2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Nicholls
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out archaeological building recording at Chaplin's public house, 14 Lichfield Street, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent. The redevelopment of the site required the demolition of the existing building. Recording consisted of a Level 2 photographic survey and drawn record, and a Level 3 written record. The project confirmed the chronological development of the building and identified the probable original internal layout of the earliest phase of the structure. The building comprised a two-storey brick structure likely to have been built in the first half of the 19th century in two phases. The first phase, built sometime between 1834 and 1851, was a purpose -built public house. By 1900 it had incorporated part of the property to the immediate north. The building was extended with single storey extensions to the west and north in the later 20th century to meet the changing requirements of the public house. It ceased trading on 15th January 2012.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon F Cleverdon
Z Sutherland
A programme of archaeological building recording was undertaken at St Augustine''s Care Home, Cobridge Road, Stoke-on-Trent (NGR SJ 8750 4848). St Augustine''s was built in 1902 by the Little Sisters of the Poor as a care home for the aged poor. It continued in use as a care home for one hundred years, latterly under the management of Prime Life Ltd. Recently the building was used as a hostel for asylum seekers until its closure in 2004. The building recording identified a main east to west range with a wing at either end and a chapel at the rear. The project confirmed the chronological development of the building as is shown on the OS maps of 1899 to the present day. Some idea of the original layout and use of the individual rooms was also achieved. In the context of similar institutions of the time, St Augustine''s seems to have offered relatively comfortable accommodation and, unsurprisingly, to have provided for spiritual as well as physical needs, possibly with a great deal of tolerance towards non Catholic faiths. The later alterations that took place at St Augustine''s concentrated upon the subdivision of rooms and illustrate an increased regard for residents'' individuality and privacy.
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2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out the recording of these three adjacent factories on behalf of RENEW North Staffordshire. The buildings were all built in the period 1880 to 1900. The Atlas Works was constructed as an iron foundry and engineering works, but was most recently used as a pottery manufactory. The Cleveland Works and Washington Pottery were both originally pottery factories, with the latter remaining as such, although substantially rebuilt and modernised. During the second half of the 20th century the Cleveland Works was occupied by a firm of upholsterers and has most recently been used as a trading estate. As a consequence of the demands of modernisation and changes in use, all the buildings had been altered to some degree. In each case, the retention of the original enabled an understanding of the overall arrangement and development of the building. The lack of original fixtures and fittings within the buildings, however, left little evidence as to the particular production processes carried out within.
Abstract icon
2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Report on the recording of the Caledonia Pottery, an early 20th-century mill for the processing of raw materials for the pottery industry. The report includes a analytical description of the complex, plans, elevations and photographs.
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2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Henshaw
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out an archaeological building recording at the former Blurton Farm Depot, Church Road, Blurton, Stoke-on-Trent. The building recording identified a complex of farm buildings built in the third quarter of the 19th century. These were constructed in a U-shape around a central courtyard, an arrangement typical of 'high farming' in this era. Whilst all the original fixtures and fittings had been removed from the buildings, the original layout had been little altered and was distinctive enough to indicate how each part of the complex had originally functioned. The original farm complex was equipped with accommodation for cattle, horses, carts and machinery and included a threshing barn in the western range, suggesting a mixed arable and fatstock estate. Subsequent changes to the complex can largely be associated with its use as a council depot in the mid-late 20th century. Some earlier alterations, however, seem to suggest a shift in farming practice from mixed arable towards a fatstock regime, likely associated with a general downturn in arable farming experienced during the late 19th century. Alterations may also have resulted from early 20th-century modernisation and mechanisation in farming.
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2009
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Nicholls
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out an archaeological building recording at the former Denton Works, located on Chaplin Road, Normacot, Stoke-on-Trent. The building recording sought to record the present appearance and layout of the works by means of a measured survey, written descriptions and photographic survey. It also charted the historical development of the works. The project successfully recorded the buildings and identified successive phases of their development, although the lack of surviving internal fixtures and fittings prevented the determination of the function of many of the rooms. The former Denton Works included buildings of different date and type that were eventually adapted and extended to house the pottery manufactory. They included former residential properties and industrial premises, the earliest of which appears to have been under construction by c.1892. The core of buildings that eventually housed the Denton Works existed on the site by 1900 and included the premises of the Premier Mineral Water Co. The Denton Works occupied part of the site by 1945 and had taken over the whole site by 1956. This resulted in piecemeal alterations to the buildings already on the site and the construction of new buildings. Since 2008 multiple occupants of the former Denton Works have either made use of or adapted the existing buildings.
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2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Nicholls
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out an archaeological building recording at the former Howard Pottery, located on Norfolk Street, Shelton. Although the survey was limited in its scope due to the poor state of the structures, the project nonetheless successfully recorded the buildings and identified successive phases of their development. The surviving buildings of the former Howard Pottery included both purpose-built industrial premises and residential properties, the earliest of which had been built by 1866. A second phase of housing had been added by 1878 and the factory building was erected on the site by 1900. The terraced housing was occupied until at least 1911, after which time it was incorporated into the factory and adapted as necessary to suit an industrial purpose. Most of the factory complex was demolished in the late 1990s.
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out an archaeological building recording on the former Wesleyan Methodist chapel, Botteslow Street, Hanley. The Level 2 standard building recording was carried out on the 14th April 2010. The chapel was a Gothic-style building built in 1906, replacing a prefabricated corrugated-iron chapel erected in 1880. Both the iron chapel and its replacement were constructed at a time of growth in population in the Potteries generally and more particularly in non-conformist congregations. The surveyed chapel comprised a principal room, probably with seating facing a pulpit at the south-west end. Ancillary rooms at the rear of the building provided space for meetings, Sunday school classes and social gatherings, supplementing facilities already provided in the adjacent Sunday school building, built 1890. Later modifications to the building were probably carried out during the occupancy of a storage and removals company. The principal room was subdivided into a number of smaller units and a first-floor was inserted above. Access to the building was also improved with the removal of a porch on its north-west side.
Abstract icon
2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out a programme of building recording at the former Hospital, surveying six of the remaining buildings on site in advance of demolition. Recording was largely limited to the exteriors of the buildings as most internal floors had been removed prior to the survey. The buildings were originally part of the Wolstanton and Burslem Union workhouse hospital complex and included two infirmaries and two nurses' accommodation blocks. Associated service buildings included a possible mortuary and laundry, later extended and adapted to become a boiler house and workshops. The hospital complex at the workhouse was established with the construction of an infirmary in 1893 and the buildings recorded as part of this project were built between 1900 and 1924. Following the abolition of the Poor Law in 1929 the workhouse and its infirmary were taken over by the local authority and, in common with many workhouses, eventually formed the core of an NHS hospital. The buildings appeared largely unchanged since their construction and in most cases had retained their original functions.
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out a Level 3 standard archaeological building recording at the former Tuscan Works, Forrister Street, Longton, Stoke-on Trent. The building recording focused upon the historic core of the pottery factory. A photographic survey of peripheral areas was also carried out. The Tuscan Works was a china manufactory built in c. 1872 by the firm Robinson, Chapman and Co. The original buildings were laid out on a courtyard plan with a decorative façade to the range fronting onto Forrister Street and with kilns located in the ranges to the rear. The works had been extended by 1900 with the addition of a second courtyard. The factory later expanded in to the former Anchor Colliery site, incorporating the former colliery office on Anchor Road, which had originally been built as a domestic dwelling.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
Recording of the former Geology building at Chatterley Whitfield Colliery. The building is neither listed nor scheduled, but is situated within the SAM of the colliery. The project was undertaken prior to the refurbishment of the building and after it had been damaged by fire.
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2008
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Z Sutherland
The Pit Head Baths complex at Chatterley Whitfield Colliery, Stoke-on-Trent was recorded in advance of refurbishment by Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology on behalf of Stoke-on-Trent City Council. The complex comprises buildings 18: Baths, 19: Canteen, 20: Medical Centre/ Deployment Wing and 21: Rescue Station, built between 1937 and 1976. The Baths and the Canteen were built by the Miners Welfare Commission in 1937 and are indicative of improvements in miner's welfare made from the early 1900s onwards. The Baths retained many of the original furniture and fittings specific to such a building. As the colliery grew, extra accommodation was added to the Canteen in the form of Building 21, built by 1951, and originally known as the feeding centre. Further changes were made following new standards introduced with nationalisation in 1947. In the mid-1950s Building 21 was altered to accommodate a dedicated rescue station, although little trace of this was identified within the structure. Building 21 was built in the mid-1960s as a Deployment Wing when a new, more efficient system of deployment was introduced. Following the closure of the colliery in 1976 the internal layout of the buildings was significantly altered. In particular the ground floor of the Baths was subdivided into office and workshop space for rental. The Chatterley Whitfield Mining Museum took over many of the buildings from 1978 until closure in 1991. Under their occupation Building 19 remained in use as the Canteen, however, Building 21 was partitioned to accommodate museum offices. More recently the buildings have been unoccupied with the exception of Building 20 which has been refurbished as a meeting place for the Friends of Chatterley Whitfield.
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2009
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon R Cramp
A Nicholls
Stoke-on-Trent Archaeology carried out a desk-based assessment on a proposed development at James Brindley High School, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. The proposed development will involve the redevelopment of the school under the Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme. The research for the assessment included consultation of cartographic, documentary and published material. A site visit was also made. The study revealed that the proposed development area remained largely undeveloped until the 20th century. In the 19th century development occurred outside the boundaries of the PDA and may have encroached upon its margins. There is, however, no specific evidence to suggest the likely presence of significant pre-modern activity within the PDA. Many structural elements of the site's recent past remain visible at present and it is probable that buried remains from the 20th century will be encountered during the proposed development. These features are not considered to be of archaeological significance and historical mapping clearly indicates the positions and former function of the remains, all of which relate to the recent use of the site for a variety of sporting activities.
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2011
 
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