Lower Lugg Valley, Herefordshire

Herefordshire Archaeology, 2007 (updated 2009)

Data copyright © Herefordshire Archaeology unless otherwise stated


Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund logo
English Heritage logo

Primary contact

Ian Bapty
Senior Projects Archaeologist
Herefordshire Archaeology
Planning Services
PO BOX 144
Hereford
HR1 2YH
UK
Tel: 01432 260470

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000326
Sample Citation for this DOI

Herefordshire Archaeology (2009) Lower Lugg Valley, Herefordshire [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000326

Herefordshire Archaeology logo

Introduction

Cremation pits

The Lower Lugg Archaeology and Aggregates Project aimed to address the protection, management and investigation of archaeological remains in the Lower Lugg Valley, Herefordshire. The valley, with its broad river flood plain, gently undulating surrounding landscape, and good agricultural land, has long been a focus of human settlement. In addition, the Lower Lugg corridor has an established strategic importance as part of the main north/south transport corridor through the Marches geographical zone. The area is also underlain by extensive reserves of sand and gravel which are of local and regional economic significance.

The project was managed and executed for English Heritage by Herefordshire Archaeology (the archaeology service of Herefordshire Council) with funding from the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund as administered by English Heritage. The project comprised a Resource Assessment of the archaeological resource of the area (Stage 1), followed by specialist research addressing key identified fieldwork/management problems associated with the deep burial of archaeological deposits within the Lower Lugg floodplain (Stage 2).