Sharman, P. (2007). Excavation of a Bronze Age funerary site at Loth Road, Sanday, Orkney. Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. https://doi.org/10.5284/1017938.

Title
Title
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Title:
Excavation of a Bronze Age funerary site at Loth Road, Sanday, Orkney
Series
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Series:
Scottish Archaeological Internet Reports
Volume
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Volume:
25
Number of Pages
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Number of Pages:
38
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Downloads:
sair25.pdf (2 MB) : Download
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Monograph Chapter (in Series)
Abstract
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Abstract:
Excavations in 1991 beside Loth Road, Sanday, revealed a funerary site, including two cists, which contained cremated human bone, and several pits. The cremation burial in one of the cists was contained in a soapstone vessel. These features presented evidence for the sorting, selection and differential deposition of pyre remains. The cists and pits were surmounted by a kerbed cairn of unusual construction. Radiocarbon dates from the pits placed the site in the Early to Middle Bronze Age.
Author
Author
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Author:
Paul Sharman
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Other Person/Org
Other Person/Org
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Other Person/Org:
Ann Clarke (Author contributing)
Ann MacSween (Author contributing)
Julie Roberts (Author contributing)
Diane M Alldritt (Author contributing)
Effie Photos-Jones (Author contributing)
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2007
ISBN
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ISBN:
0 903903 95 4
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0 903903 95 4
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5284/1017938
Created Date
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Created Date:
01 May 2011

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
Download available from the ADS icon 1
Excavations in 1991 beside Loth Road, Sanday, revealed a funerary site, including two cists, which contained cremated human bone, and several pits. The cremation burial in one of the cists was contained in a soapstone vessel. These features presented evidence for the sorting, selection and differential deposition of pyre remains. The cists and pits were surmounted by a kerbed cairn of unusual construction. Radiocarbon dates from the pits placed the site in the Early to Middle Bronze Age.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 2 - 3
Details of site location, archaeological background and a summary account of the project are presented.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 4 - 10
A detailed archaeological description is presented along with phasing and radiocarbon dates.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Julie Roberts
11 - 13
The specialist report on a small and poorly preserved quantity of human bone considers the evidence for minimum number of individuals, age at death, sex and mortuary practice.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Julie A Roberts
11 - 13
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Diane M Alldritt
14 - 15
The analysis of the material produced no evidence for domestic activities, such as cereal processing, for the use of plant material as votive offerings or for feasting. Pit contexts contained the highest concentration of burnt peat and heather fragments, while cist contexts contained the highest concentration of cremated bone fragments with very few carbonised plant remains.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Diane M Alldritt
14 - 15
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Effie Photos-Jones
16 - 17
This analysis aims to elucidate the nature and composition of vitrified fuel ash waste or cramp.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Effie Photos-Jones
16 - 17
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Ann MacSween
18
Specialist report on a small assemblage comprising five undiagnostic sherds from a single vessel.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Ann MacSween
18
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Ann Clarke
19 - 20
Specialist report on a small assemblage comprising five flaked stone bars, 1 ard, 1 flint flake and a large stone disc used as a lid for a steatite vessel.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Ann Clarke
19 - 20
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Paul Sharman
21 - 24
Specialist report on two steatite vessels, one from a cist and one from a pit.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Paul Sharman
21 - 24
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 25 - 28
The excavations have revealed some of the physical remnants of what may have been an extensive and prolonged series of events that comprised the funerary ritual. Cremation, burial of selected remains and the construction of a monument are the most obvious archaeological parts of these events.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 29
Funerary rites the world over confirm relationships between the living, and establish a different relationship with the newly dead. These relationships may not end with the burial, but continue long after in dialogues with the ancestors, in physical or incorporeal form. Rites of placation or supplication and rituals of remembrance may all have a part to play.
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Download available from the ADS icon 30
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 31 - 33
No Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Paul Sharman
Excavations in 1991 beside Loth Road, Sanday, revealed a funerary site, including two cists, which contained cremated human bone, and several pits. The cremation burial in one of the cists was contained in a soapstone vessel. These features presented evidence for the sorting, selection and differential deposition of pyre remains. The cists and pits were surmounted by a kerbed cairn of unusual construction. Radiocarbon dates from the pits placed the site in the Early to Middle Bronze Age.
Abstract icon