Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
34
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2005
Source
Source
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Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
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Download available from the ADS icon Peter J Fowler
K D Strutt
1 - 27
An area of unimproved heathland on Hartington Moor, situated some 250m above OD on the higher western limit of the Wansbeck drainage basin, was chosen for archaeological survey as a piece of landscape intermediate between the higher uplands to the west and north and the lower claylands of central and coastal Northumberland. The aim of the survey was to assess the extent and nature of the upstanding archaeology and associated patterns of land-use. The survey methodology combined field-walking with detailed planning of important monuments and basic documentary research. Results indicated a range of settlement nuclei and associated land-use across the moorland, the whole forming an archaeological landscape, with a sequence of sites dating from the Neolithic onwards, including quite intensive occupation of the area in the Bronze Age and Iron Age through to the Roman period. A change in the pattern of settlement seems to have then taken place, with a decrease in the nuclei represented in the archaeology, and a shift from mixed agriculture to pasture. In all, 170 features were recorded over an area of c. 3 sq kms. Includes
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Clive Waddington
Benjamin Johnson
Aron Mazel
29 - 54
The paper reports the findings from an excavation on a cup and ring marked outcrop rock in Northumberland. The excavation revealed an initial phase of carving cup and ring motifs on outcropping bedrock that predated the Early Bronze Age by a length of time which is unknown but considered to be substantial. At what is believed on the basis of weathering to be a considerably later date, parts of the rock outcrop were quarried, presumably as part of a cairn building episode, and new motifs were carved onto the surfaces where rock had been removed. What appears to be a cist box, probably for an infant, was constructed between two quarried slabs, one with phase 1 carvings on its surface. A cairn was then piled over the cist and central rock dome, and a stone setting was made towards the top of the cairn which may have served as a grave for a secondary burial. This type of monument is typical of the Early Bronze Age and nearby sites have produced radiocarbon determinations dating towards the centuries around 2000 BC. The cairn directly overlay the cist as well as some of the phase 1 and phase 2 carvings. After the construction of the cairn the next structural event was the aligning of a Romano-British field boundary on the cairn and probably beyond. The excavation report is followed by a discussion that places the findings in a wider context, including preliminary interpretation of the site in relation to current thinking in British rock art studies.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Christopher Tolan-Smith
55 - 65
A small cairn was discovered during fieldwork on Birkside Fell in the North Pennines. The physical characteristics of the monument, as revealed by excavation, suggest that it should be classified as a ring cairn. Two cremations were found within a single collared urn. Radiocarbon dates place the burial within the earlier part of the second millennium BC. The results of the excavation are discussed within the wider context of similar sites in the region.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Matthew Symonds
67 - 81
The author reassesses F Simpson's 1931 contention that broad and narrow walls were used in milecastle construction; the contention is then used to reconstruct their building order. This reveals clusters of early, broad wall, milecastles adjacent to features which can be described as points of strategic importance. It is suggested that the unusual size of milecastles 47 and 48 is a consequence of their early construction, while the provision of large double barrack blocks within them is due to their construction prior to the fort decision. As well as broad and narrow gauge perimeter walls, the study reveals some evidence for a middle gauge. This was restricted to the completion of milecastles started to the broad standard and can be shown, through its relationship to Great Chesters, to predate the narrow gauge.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Frank McCombie
83 - 94
The site and existence of a Pilgrim's Inn on Newcastle's Pilgrim Street have long been a matter of debate. The paper re-examines the evidence, and clarifies the meaning of `Pilgrim' in the street name.
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Download available from the ADS icon Sophia Adams
95 - 100
An archaeological evaluation and excavation at Stowell Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, revealed a sequence of archaeological deposits and features dating from the late medieval period to the nineteenth century. The site appears to have been an open area just to the east of the town wall and on the edge of the Lam Burn during the late medieval period. It became incorporated within garden plots, which were probably part of the Blackfriars land by the early post-medieval period. A building was constructed on the site by 1830 and this was extant until the latter half of the twentieth century.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Graeme Lawson
101 - 114
Article on the origins of the tradition of Northumbrian bagpipes, as represented in the Society of Antiquaries of Northumberland's collection. It is argued that finds of wood and bone from the east of England reveal a preference for reed-voiced pipes of similar length and narrow bore, these being in everyday use during the Middle Ages, the Anglo-Saxon period and even Roman times, the sound produced being strikingly similar to that of Northumbrian bagpipes. Close inspection of the finger-hole margins of some finds reveals traces which indicated deliberate tuning, a purpose which is reflected in some features of tunings of the Society's pipes.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Robin Dix
115 - 119
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Download available from the ADS icon Jonathan Oates
121 - 128
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Download available from the ADS icon Leslie W Hepple
129 - 150
Paper investigating the life and career of Alexander Davison (1750--1829), a Northumbrian contractor and government supplier, and close associate and friend of Lord Nelson. It traces the background to the Nelson obelisk erected by Davison in 1807 at Swarland, Northumberland, and examines the evidence for the `Battle-Park', representing the British fleet at the Battle of the Nile, which Davison also laid out at Swarland park. Davison's landscape legacy, both around his Swarland estate and adjacent to the Cheviots at Kirknewton, is described.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 151 - 153
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Download available from the ADS icon Nicholas Hodgson
151 - 152
The author responds to the reply given by A Breeze (in Archaeologia Aeliana 33 (2004), pages61--4) to his original article (see Archaeologia Aeliana 30 (2002), pages 173--4), itself a critique of an article by Breeze (see Durham Archaeological Journal 16 (2001), pages 21--5).
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Andrew Breeze
152 - 153
The author discusses the origin of the name of the River Irthing, suggesting that it derives from an ancient British term meaning `little bear' and that it may have been linked with a Celtic cult of bears.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon 155 - 167
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Download available from the ADS icon Clive Waddington
155 - 156
Note on a ground and polished stone axe head found during works to the west of Doddington village, Northumberland, in 2004. The axe head appears to be made from Langdale Tuff, and has flattened sides characteristic of some Langdale axe heads. From its proximity to at least two ring ditches and to finds of flints including a barbed and tanged arrowhead, and dates obtained for peat sediments in the same field, the author suggests a Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age date of before 2000 BC for the find.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon G Stobbs
Steve Speak
157 - 158
Note on a single cup-marked stone recovered in 2002 during the archaeological evaluation of part of a rectilinear enclosure at Seaton Delaval, Northumberland. No datable material was recovered during the excavation, although the enclosure is typologically of a type assigned to the Iron Age or Romano-British period.
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Download available from the ADS icon Alison Sheridan
158 - 167
Note on recent research carried out on the contents and wrapping material of a small steatite cinerary urn from Orkney, now in the museum of the Society of Antiquaries of Northumberland. The discovery and history of the urn, its contents and wrapping, and the urn itself are described along with the results of investigations. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the funerary assemblage dates to the mid-first millennium AD, and the implications of this late date are discussed. Includes
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Download available from the ADS icon Roger W Fern
177 - 188
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