Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Archaeologia Aeliana Series 5
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Archaeologia Aeliana
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
38
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2009
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
ADS Archive (ADS Archive)
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 May 2019

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
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Abstract
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Download available from the ADS icon Lindsay Allason-Jones
1 - 21
In April 2008 the Museum of Antiquities in Newcastle closed its doors to the public in advance of the transfer of the Society's archaeological collections to the new Great North Museum. It seemed appropriate, as we enter this new stage in the Society's history, that the Museum of Antiquities and its achievements over is half century of existence be chronicled and celebrated.
Abstract icon
Download available from the ADS icon Clive Waddington
23 - 29
This preliminary report records the discovery of multi-phased Neolithic occupation, Bronze Age houses, Iron Age cist graves and Anglo-Saxon settlement and industrial activity at Lanton Quarry in the Milfield Basin.
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Download available from the ADS icon Crispian Oates
31 - 42
Following the discovery of an unusual holed stone on the raised platform round the east side of the Spy Law Beacon, an informal survey of the platform was undertaken and the alignment of the holed stone investigated. This has shown that the holed stone is aligned with the rising and setting of the sun at the solstices. At the summer solstice sunset, the sun shines through the hole producing the dramatic effect of a bright light in the centre of the stone. A coincidental alignment with the sunrise at the equinoxes was also found. The origin of the hole is considered.
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Download available from the ADS icon Timothy Gates
43 - 85
Two seasons of excavations were carried out, during 1981 and 1986. Three trenches were opened, to examine the roundhouse, a 5-m long section of the field boundary where it passed close to the ring bank, and one of the clearance cairns within the field. A single series of context numbers was assigned to structural features and soil layers alike. Specialist reports are provided for soil, wood charcoal, carbonised plant material radiocarbon dates, and a general summary and discussion. The existence of three hillforts and 10 enclosed settlements of stone-built roundhouses around the moorland edge in the general area demonstrate the potential for a sizeable population during the pre-Roman and Roman Iron Age, while other evidence suggests pastoralism as the dominant activity in the uplands around the middle Iron Age. The crop samples from Halls Hill are the first to be recovered from a domestic site of the late Bronze or early Iron Age in the north of England, and include the earliest record of spelt in the region. The structure of the timber roundhouse is of considerable interest and could have important consequences for the understanding of both the structure and appearance of these architecturally sophisticated buildings.
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Download available from the ADS icon David J Breeze
87 - 103
It is frequently suggested that Hadrian designed Hadrian's Wall, yet there has been no detailed analysis of this proposition. The evidence for the emperor's possible involvement is considered, together with the unusual nature of the frontier, in the light of new research on the building of the Wall. The conclusion is reached that Hadrian could have been, and probably was, involved in planning the unusual elements of the Wall, which include the regularity of positioning, milecastles, forts astride the Wall, the Vallum and putative wall-walk. This allows us to reject Mommsen's argument that the greater strength of Hadrian's Wall in comparison to the German frontiers was because it was under greater military pressure.
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Download available from the ADS icon Philip N Wood
S Groves
Graeme Young
105 - 122
This paper presents the results of a limited archaeological investigation of the Bowl Hole cemetery site adjacent to Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland. Although the existence of the site was known from antiquarian reports from the 19th century, its exact location was uncertain prior to the present programme of research. The limited finds evidence and 14C assays indicate a date range between the 6th to 8th centuries AD. Substantial variation was seen within the small sample of burials investigated and at least two phases of burial is proposed.
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Download available from the ADS icon Andrew Breeze
123 - 127
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Download available from the ADS icon B J N Edwards
129 - 137
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Download available from the ADS icon John Penn
139 - 149
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Download available from the ADS icon Ian Curry
151 - 160
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Download available from the ADS icon 161 - 162
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Download available from the ADS icon J C Mabbit
161
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Download available from the ADS icon Richard N Bailey
162
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Download available from the ADS icon Roger W Fern
163 - 173
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