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Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 2003 (updated 2017)

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000184
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Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (2017) The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000184

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland

Volume 6 (1864-5), Appendix.

ON ANCIENT SCULPTURINGS OF CUPS AND CONCENTRIC RINGS, &C.

J.Y. Simpson

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

PART I. VARIETIES IN THE SCULPTURES

CHAPTER I. Principal Types of the Cup and Ring Cuttings
Co-existence of Different Types

CHAPTER II. Some of the Chief Deviations from the Generic Types

CHAPTER III. Modes of Production of the Sculpture

PART II. LOCALITIES OF THE SCULPTURES

CHAPTER IV. On Stones Connected with Archaic Sepulture, as-

  1. On Stones of Megalithic Circles

  2. On Stones of Megalitliic Avenues

  3. On Stones of Cromlechs

  4. On Chambered Tumuli

  5. On Stone-Cists, and Covers of Urns

  6. On Standing Stones, or Monoliths

CHAPTER V. On Stones Connected with Archaic Habitations, as-

  7. In Weems, or Underground Houses

  8. In Fortified Buildings

  9. In and Near Ancient Towns and Camps

10. On the Surface of Isolated Rocks
On Isolated Stones

PART III. ANALOGOUS SCULPTURES IN OTHER COUNTRIES

CHAPTER VI. Lapidary Sculpturings in Ireland

CHAPTER VII. Lapidary Sculpturings in Brittany

CHAPTER VIII. Lapidary Sculpturings in Scandinavia

PART IV. GENERAL INFERENCES

CHAPTER IX. Import of the Ring and Cup Cuttings

CHAPTER X. Their Alleged Phoenician Origin

CHAPTER XI. Their Probable Ornamental Character

CHAPTER XII. Their Possibly Religious Character

CHAPTER XII. Question of their Age or Date

CHAPTER XIV. Their Precedence of Letters and Traditions

CHAPTER XV. Their Connection with Archaic Towns and Dwellings

CHAPTER XVI. Their Presence on the Stones of the most Ancient Kinds of Sepulture

CHAPTER XVII. The Archaic Character of the Contemporaneous Relics found in Combination with them

CHAPTER XVIII. The Kind of Tools Required for the Sculpturings

CHAPTER XIX. Their Antiquity, as shown by their Geographical Distribution in the British Islands

CHAPTER XX. The Race that first Introduced the Lapidary Ring and Cup Sculpturings

APPENDIX

  NOTICES OF SOME ANCIENT SCULPTURES ON THE WALLS OF CAVES IN FIFE

  EXPLANATION OF THE PLATES