Comments Open on OASIS Redevelopment Mock Up

Thank you if you responded to the OASIS redevelopment survey over the summer, we have now produced a selection of scenarios which reflect the survey responses. We will be making the survey responses available in due course

The mock up is divided into different scenarios for different types of user: Contractor, HER, Museum etc and each page has a comment area at the bottom. Please use the comments area to leave any feedback you have, positive or negative, as if we don’t know your thoughts now we cannot accommodate them in the final design. We would appreciate your comments even if you are not a user of the current system.

http://oasis.ac.uk/form/redev_demo/

The mock up will be open for comments until Sunday 8th February.

Providing feedback will give you a real opportunity to influence the redevelopment of OASIS.

If you have any questions about this, or the project in general, please contact the ADS via Jo Gilham on jo.gilham@york.ac.uk or 01904 323937.

ADS welcomes the NEARCH partners to York!

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​NEARCH partners enjoying a December hailstorm on their way to start the meeting in York.

ADS was delighted to host the NEARCH partners on 11-12 December, 2014 for both a plenary meeting, and the first of the NEARCH scientific sessions. As it was winter in the north of England, the partners first had to brave a hailstorm, lasting just the few minutes walk from their hotel to the meeting venue!

Continue reading ADS welcomes the NEARCH partners to York!

On the 12th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a windswept Bronze Age site,

        a dig team in the office,  an icy Roscommon Castle, a Temple to Saturn, Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

H_Spencer_Carter

This  image was submitted by Spencer Carter of a site hoped to be Mesolithic, but turned out to be Bronze Age, Where have we heard that before…?

Related resources (if it was Mesolithic…!)

Mesolithic themed issue in Internet Archaeology

Paul R. Preston 2009 ‘Cache and Carry: lithic technology and Mesolithic mobility’, Internet Archaeology 26. DOI: 10.11141/ia.26.25

Gaffney, V. et al. 2013 ‘Time and a Place: A luni-solar ‘time-reckoner’ from 8th millennium BC Scotland‘, Internet Archaeology 34. DOI: 10.11141/ia.34.1

On the 11th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a dig team in the office,

          an icy Roscommon Castle, a Temple to Saturn, Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

T_WAScotland (2)

T_WAScotland

These photos were submitted by the team from Wessex Archaeology Scotland. It looks there was partaking of mulled wine somewhere along the way!

Related resources

Possible alcohol consumption noted in Pottery consumption and cultural change from M. Pitts 2006 ‘Consumption, deposition and social practice: a ceramic approach to intra-site analysis in late Iron Age to Roman Britain’, Internet Archaeology 21.

On the 10th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

an icy Roscommon Castle,

           a Temple to Saturn, Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

F_Frank_Scott_via ireland fieldwork

Frank Scott submitted this image via Facebook of  Roscommon Castle, Ireland. It made a particularly striking panorama when cropped.

Related resources

Castles come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Some are even virtual! J. Huggett and C. Guo-Yuan 2000 ‘3D Interpretative Modelling of Archaeological Sites/A Computer Reconstruction of a Medieval Timber and Earthwork Castle’, Internet Archaeology 8.

On the 9th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a Temple to Saturn,

           Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

H_Massimo_Brando5

Massimo Brando submitted this excellent image of the snow frosted Temple of Saturn in Rome.

Related resources

For more on Rome’s temples, see N. Terrenato et al. 2012 ‘The S. Omobono Sanctuary in Rome: Assessing eighty years of fieldwork and exploring perspectives for the future‘, Internet Archaeology 31.

Or dip your toes into maritime Rome with the evolution of Rome’s maritime facade: archaeology and geomorphology at Castelporziano archive.

On the 8th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

Christmas jumpers in the lab,

           a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,  a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

T_VLeQuelenec

Jumpers from Jersey! Viki Le Quelenec submitted this image from Jersey Heritage of their staff in festive Christmas outfits – the one on the right is an interesting take on the usual festive greeting!

Related resources

Some of the most exciting archaeological work is done in the lab post-excavation, whether we’re wearing Christmas jumpers or not.  See To Block Lift or not to Block Lift? An Experiment at the Early Mesolithic Site of Star Carr, North-East Yorkshire, UK in Internet Archaeology 28.

Or for something slightly warmer! You might want to consider AustArch: A Database of 14C and Luminescence Ages from Archaeological Sites in Australia.

 

On the 7th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a snowy Silbury Hill,

   two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill,  a sweeping digger in the snow,  a frosty Grimspound, a Lewis chess piece, and a snow capped Avebury.

H_Paul_Adams1

This photo was submitted by Paul Adams our ultimate competition winner, but it was such a great image of Silbury Hill we had to include this in our 12 days of Christmas as well.

Related resources

If you want to find out more about Silbury Hill, the digital archive for the Silbury Hill Conservation Project contains data created over 12 years from a desk-based assessment in 2000 to the recent remedial works in 2007/2008.

On the 6th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

two ‘geofizzing’ students,

          a  snow covered Castle Hill,  a sweeping digger in the snow,  a frosty Grimspound, a Lewis chess piece, and a snow capped Avebury.

H_Helen_Goodchild

Helen Goodchild submitted this photo of two University of York students carrying out geophysical survey training in the snow. Dedicated or what!

Related resources

Geophysics is a fabulous non-destructive tool in the archaeologist’s toolkit. See Brown at al. Making Place for a Viking Fortress for an archaeological and geophysical reassessment of the Viking settlement at Aggersborg, Denmark.

ADS also hosts English Heritage’s Geophysical Survey Database. The English Heritage Geophysical Survey Database was created in 1995 to provide a publically accessible index of all the geophysical surveys of archaeological sites undertaken by English Heritage. So why not see if a survey has been carried out on a site near you!

On the 5th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a snow covered Castle Hill,

                     a sweeping digger in the snow, a frosty Grimspound, a Lewis chess piece, and a snow capped Avebury.

H_Jason_Dodds

Jason Dodds the HER Officer at West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service (WYAAS) submitted this photo of Castle Hill situated in Almondbury, south of Huddersfield. © WYAAS.

The monument includes the remains of a late Bronze Age or Early Iron Age univalate hillfort, a later Iron Age multivalate hillfort, a twelfth century motte and bailey castle and (as has been suggested) the site of a deserted medieval village, although this is now doubtful. Evidence for occupation and development of the site comes from a series of partial excavations carried out by W.J. Varley between 1939 and 1973.

Related resources

You can find out more about Castle Hill in the West Yorkshire Archaeological Service Geophysical Survey Archive which includes the survey report, and the gradiometer data files.

And if castles are you thing you might like to check out the Norwich, Castle Mall archive by the Norfolk Archaeological Unit.